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The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills

George Zacharopoulos, Francesco Sella, Uzay Emir, Roi Cohen Kadosh

Scientific Reports, Volume: 11, Issue: 1, Pages: 17656 - 17656

Swansea University Author: George Zacharopoulos

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Abstract

Several scientific, engineering, and medical advancements are based on breakthroughs made by people who excel in mathematics. Our current understanding of the underlying brain networks stems primarily from anatomical and functional investigations, but our knowledge of how neurotransmitters subserve...

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Published in: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322 2045-2322
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58258
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first_indexed 2021-11-10T17:08:50Z
last_indexed 2021-11-11T04:25:36Z
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spelling v2 58258 2021-10-06 The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills 7abcfe5e6fd29d20e2c53eff9a4098d1 George Zacharopoulos George Zacharopoulos true false 2021-10-06 HPS Several scientific, engineering, and medical advancements are based on breakthroughs made by people who excel in mathematics. Our current understanding of the underlying brain networks stems primarily from anatomical and functional investigations, but our knowledge of how neurotransmitters subserve numerical skills, the building block of mathematics, is scarce. Using <sup>1</sup>H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (N = 54, 3T, semi-LASER sequence, TE = 32 ms, TR = 3.5 s), the study examined the relation between numerical skills and the brain's major inhibitory (GABA) and excitatory (glutamate) neurotransmitters. A negative association was found between the performance in a number sequences task and the resting concentration of GABA within the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS), a key region supporting numeracy. The relation between GABA in the IPS and number sequences was specific to (1) parietal but not frontal regions and to (2) GABA but not glutamate. It was additionally found that the resting functional connectivity of the left IPS and the left superior frontal gyrus was positively associated with number sequences performance. However, resting GABA concentration within the IPS explained number sequences performance above and beyond the resting frontoparietal connectivity measure. Our findings further motivate the study of inhibition mechanisms in the human brain and significantly contribute to our current understanding of numerical cognition's biological bases. Journal Article Scientific Reports 11 1 17656 17656 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2045-2322 2045-2322 3 9 2021 2021-09-03 10.1038/s41598-021-95370-3 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University Other Wellcome Trust Grant: 203139/Z/16/Z European Research Council Grant: 338065 2023-09-13T17:14:36.4521039 2021-10-06T10:44:32.0709100 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology George Zacharopoulos 1 Francesco Sella 2 Uzay Emir 3 Roi Cohen Kadosh 4 58258__21484__5e3b2f803293446593f72029fef314d7.pdf 58258.pdf 2021-11-10T17:09:46.8696589 Output 2050000 application/pdf Version of Record true © The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills
spellingShingle The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills
George Zacharopoulos
title_short The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills
title_full The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills
title_fullStr The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills
title_full_unstemmed The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills
title_sort The relation between parietal GABA concentration and numerical skills
author_id_str_mv 7abcfe5e6fd29d20e2c53eff9a4098d1
author_id_fullname_str_mv 7abcfe5e6fd29d20e2c53eff9a4098d1_***_George Zacharopoulos
author George Zacharopoulos
author2 George Zacharopoulos
Francesco Sella
Uzay Emir
Roi Cohen Kadosh
format Journal article
container_title Scientific Reports
container_volume 11
container_issue 1
container_start_page 17656
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 2045-2322
2045-2322
doi_str_mv 10.1038/s41598-021-95370-3
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Several scientific, engineering, and medical advancements are based on breakthroughs made by people who excel in mathematics. Our current understanding of the underlying brain networks stems primarily from anatomical and functional investigations, but our knowledge of how neurotransmitters subserve numerical skills, the building block of mathematics, is scarce. Using <sup>1</sup>H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (N = 54, 3T, semi-LASER sequence, TE = 32 ms, TR = 3.5 s), the study examined the relation between numerical skills and the brain's major inhibitory (GABA) and excitatory (glutamate) neurotransmitters. A negative association was found between the performance in a number sequences task and the resting concentration of GABA within the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS), a key region supporting numeracy. The relation between GABA in the IPS and number sequences was specific to (1) parietal but not frontal regions and to (2) GABA but not glutamate. It was additionally found that the resting functional connectivity of the left IPS and the left superior frontal gyrus was positively associated with number sequences performance. However, resting GABA concentration within the IPS explained number sequences performance above and beyond the resting frontoparietal connectivity measure. Our findings further motivate the study of inhibition mechanisms in the human brain and significantly contribute to our current understanding of numerical cognition's biological bases.
published_date 2021-09-03T17:14:38Z
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