No Cover Image

Journal article 152 views 41 downloads

Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment

Catherine Purcell, Amy Romijn Orcid Logo

Journal of Education and Educational Development, Volume: 7, Issue: 1, Pages: 44 - 54

Swansea University Author: Amy Romijn Orcid Logo

  • 58322.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

    Download (779.9KB)

Abstract

The importance of road safety education is widely acknowledged; however, there is a lack of consistency in road safety interventions currently being used in UK schools. Furthermore, the majority of road safety educational programmes use knowledge-based methods, which do not necessarily translate to...

Full description

Published in: Journal of Education and Educational Development
ISSN: 2310-0869 2313-3538
Published: Institute of Business Management 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58322
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2021-10-13T16:01:02Z
last_indexed 2021-11-10T04:25:37Z
id cronfa58322
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-11-09T12:24:43.4924374</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>58322</id><entry>2021-10-13</entry><title>Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-5014-1539</ORCID><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Romijn</surname><name>Amy Romijn</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2021-10-13</date><deptcode>HPS</deptcode><abstract>The importance of road safety education is widely acknowledged; however, there is a lack of consistency in road safety interventions currently being used in UK schools. Furthermore, the majority of road safety educational programmes use knowledge-based methods, which do not necessarily translate to improved behaviour in real traffic environments. The use of virtual reality is starting to emerge as a viable option, as it allows for repeated risk-free practice. This study aimed to test the efficacy and playability of a virtual reality road crossing iPad-based game with children aged 7-9 years. A total of 137 children from primary school years 3 and 4 completed the study. The game comprised ten levels increasing in complexity. Participants navigated to a target using a magic portal into the virtual world (the iPad position matching the direction of travel). Remote, anonymous in-game data were collected and the results suggested that performance was significantly better on their final attempt compared to their first attempt, regardless of age of gender. Overall, the results suggest that the iPad-based game allowed the children to practice road crossing in an immersive environment, without risk, and could provide a useful, evidence-based addition to current road safety education in UK schools.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Education and Educational Development</journal><volume>7</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart>44</paginationStart><paginationEnd>54</paginationEnd><publisher>Institute of Business Management</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>2310-0869</issnPrint><issnElectronic>2313-3538</issnElectronic><keywords>gaming, primary education, road safety, tablet technology, virtual reality</keywords><publishedDay>30</publishedDay><publishedMonth>6</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2020</publishedYear><publishedDate>2020-06-30</publishedDate><doi>10.22555/joeed.v7i1.2948</doi><url>http://jmsnew.iobmresearch.com/index.php/joeed/article/view/7</url><notes>http://jmsnew.iobmresearch.com/index.php/joeed/article/view/7</notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Psychology</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HPS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><funders>Road Safety Trust award RST_14_2_16</funders><lastEdited>2021-11-09T12:24:43.4924374</lastEdited><Created>2021-10-13T16:59:11.5042297</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Psychology</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Catherine</firstname><surname>Purcell</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Romijn</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5014-1539</orcid><order>2</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>58322__21462__11ae64491e5544c9a50ce05ffd568c1b.pdf</filename><originalFilename>58322.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2021-11-09T12:21:02.6233075</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>798617</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language><licence>https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</licence></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-11-09T12:24:43.4924374 v2 58322 2021-10-13 Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555 0000-0001-5014-1539 Amy Romijn Amy Romijn true false 2021-10-13 HPS The importance of road safety education is widely acknowledged; however, there is a lack of consistency in road safety interventions currently being used in UK schools. Furthermore, the majority of road safety educational programmes use knowledge-based methods, which do not necessarily translate to improved behaviour in real traffic environments. The use of virtual reality is starting to emerge as a viable option, as it allows for repeated risk-free practice. This study aimed to test the efficacy and playability of a virtual reality road crossing iPad-based game with children aged 7-9 years. A total of 137 children from primary school years 3 and 4 completed the study. The game comprised ten levels increasing in complexity. Participants navigated to a target using a magic portal into the virtual world (the iPad position matching the direction of travel). Remote, anonymous in-game data were collected and the results suggested that performance was significantly better on their final attempt compared to their first attempt, regardless of age of gender. Overall, the results suggest that the iPad-based game allowed the children to practice road crossing in an immersive environment, without risk, and could provide a useful, evidence-based addition to current road safety education in UK schools. Journal Article Journal of Education and Educational Development 7 1 44 54 Institute of Business Management 2310-0869 2313-3538 gaming, primary education, road safety, tablet technology, virtual reality 30 6 2020 2020-06-30 10.22555/joeed.v7i1.2948 http://jmsnew.iobmresearch.com/index.php/joeed/article/view/7 http://jmsnew.iobmresearch.com/index.php/joeed/article/view/7 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University Road Safety Trust award RST_14_2_16 2021-11-09T12:24:43.4924374 2021-10-13T16:59:11.5042297 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Catherine Purcell 1 Amy Romijn 0000-0001-5014-1539 2 58322__21462__11ae64491e5544c9a50ce05ffd568c1b.pdf 58322.pdf 2021-11-09T12:21:02.6233075 Output 798617 application/pdf Version of Record true This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment
spellingShingle Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment
Amy Romijn
title_short Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment
title_full Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment
title_fullStr Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment
title_full_unstemmed Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment
title_sort Teaching children road safety using a simulated environment
author_id_str_mv e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555
author_id_fullname_str_mv e360b00b12b720c52e38c94a539e6555_***_Amy Romijn
author Amy Romijn
author2 Catherine Purcell
Amy Romijn
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Education and Educational Development
container_volume 7
container_issue 1
container_start_page 44
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 2310-0869
2313-3538
doi_str_mv 10.22555/joeed.v7i1.2948
publisher Institute of Business Management
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
url http://jmsnew.iobmresearch.com/index.php/joeed/article/view/7
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The importance of road safety education is widely acknowledged; however, there is a lack of consistency in road safety interventions currently being used in UK schools. Furthermore, the majority of road safety educational programmes use knowledge-based methods, which do not necessarily translate to improved behaviour in real traffic environments. The use of virtual reality is starting to emerge as a viable option, as it allows for repeated risk-free practice. This study aimed to test the efficacy and playability of a virtual reality road crossing iPad-based game with children aged 7-9 years. A total of 137 children from primary school years 3 and 4 completed the study. The game comprised ten levels increasing in complexity. Participants navigated to a target using a magic portal into the virtual world (the iPad position matching the direction of travel). Remote, anonymous in-game data were collected and the results suggested that performance was significantly better on their final attempt compared to their first attempt, regardless of age of gender. Overall, the results suggest that the iPad-based game allowed the children to practice road crossing in an immersive environment, without risk, and could provide a useful, evidence-based addition to current road safety education in UK schools.
published_date 2020-06-30T04:14:57Z
_version_ 1737027902594088960
score 10.917267