No Cover Image

Journal article 43 views 18 downloads

Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)

Michaela James Orcid Logo, Emily Marchant Orcid Logo, Margaret Anne Defeyter, Jayne Woodside, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo

BMJ Open, Volume: 11, Issue: 10, Start page: e051574

Swansea University Authors: Michaela James Orcid Logo, Emily Marchant Orcid Logo, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo

  • bmjopen-2021-051574.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license

    Download (469.57KB)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to explore the relationship between initial school closures and children’s health by comparing health and well-being outcomes collected during school closures (April–June 2020) via HAPPEN (the Health and Attainment of Pupils in a Primary Education Network) with data from...

Full description

Published in: BMJ Open
ISSN: 2044-6055 2044-6055
Published: BMJ 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58392
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2021-10-18T14:40:35Z
last_indexed 2021-11-04T04:24:43Z
id cronfa58392
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-11-03T12:30:12.0222169</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>58392</id><entry>2021-10-18</entry><title>Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018&#x2013;2020)</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>9a717d184fb8f768e462d95b91e63e23</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-7047-0049</ORCID><firstname>Michaela</firstname><surname>James</surname><name>Michaela James</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>d68adb6744707b3bd75e07bd334d0516</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-9701-5991</ORCID><firstname>Emily</firstname><surname>Marchant</surname><name>Emily Marchant</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>84f5661b35a729f55047f9e793d8798b</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-7417-2858</ORCID><firstname>Sinead</firstname><surname>Brophy</surname><name>Sinead Brophy</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2021-10-18</date><deptcode>HDAT</deptcode><abstract>Objectives: This study aimed to explore the relationship between initial school closures and children&#x2019;s health by comparing health and well-being outcomes collected during school closures (April&#x2013;June 2020) via HAPPEN (the Health and Attainment of Pupils in a Primary Education Network) with data from the same period in 2019 and 2018 via the HAPPEN Survey. Setting: The study was conducted online with 161 primary schools across Wales involved in the &#x2018;HAPPEN At Home&#x2019; Survey. Participants: Data were collected via the &#x2018;HAPPEN At Home&#x2019; Survey capturing the typical health behaviours of children aged 8&#x2013;11 years from 1333 participants across Wales. These data were compared with data in 2018 and 2019 also collected between April and June, from HAPPEN (2019 (n=1150) and 2018 (n=475)). Primary and secondary outcome measures: Primary outcomes included validated measures of physical activity, screen time, diet and dental health, as well as well-being, competency and autonomy. Free school meal (FSM) status was used as a proxy for socioeconomic deprivation. Analyses were repeated stratifying by FSM. Results: Comparing responses between April&#x2013;June in 2020 (n=1068), 2019 (n=1150) and 2018 (n=475), there were improvements in physical activity levels, sleep time, happiness and general well-being for children during school closures compared with previous years. However, children on FSM ate fewer fruits and vegetables (21% less at five or more portions of fruits and vegetables (95% CI: 5.7% to 37%)) and had lower self-assessed school competence compared with 2019. Compared with those not on FSM, they also spent less time doing physical activity (13.03%, 95% CI: 3.3% to 21.7%) and consumed more takeaways (16.3%, 95% CI: 2% to 30%) during school closures. Conclusions: This study suggests that schools are important in reducing inequalities in physical health. The physical health (eg, physical activity and diet) of children eligible for FSM may be affected by prolonged school closures.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>BMJ Open</journal><volume>11</volume><journalNumber>10</journalNumber><paginationStart>e051574</paginationStart><paginationEnd/><publisher>BMJ</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>2044-6055</issnPrint><issnElectronic>2044-6055</issnElectronic><keywords>Public health, 1506, 2474, 1724, COVID-19, public health, community child health</keywords><publishedDay>8</publishedDay><publishedMonth>10</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-10-08</publishedDate><doi>10.1136/bmjopen-2021-051574</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Health Data Science</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HDAT</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><funders>National Centre for Population Health and Wellbeing Research (NCPHWR)</funders><lastEdited>2021-11-03T12:30:12.0222169</lastEdited><Created>2021-10-18T15:37:37.9810768</Created><path><level id="1">Swansea University Medical School</level><level id="2">Medicine</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Michaela</firstname><surname>James</surname><orcid>0000-0001-7047-0049</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Emily</firstname><surname>Marchant</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9701-5991</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Margaret Anne</firstname><surname>Defeyter</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Jayne</firstname><surname>Woodside</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Sinead</firstname><surname>Brophy</surname><orcid>0000-0001-7417-2858</orcid><order>5</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>58392__21215__d292de8f1f6541488f816770f60797d8.pdf</filename><originalFilename>bmjopen-2021-051574.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2021-10-18T15:37:37.9810271</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>480841</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>&#xA9; Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language><licence>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/</licence></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-11-03T12:30:12.0222169 v2 58392 2021-10-18 Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020) 9a717d184fb8f768e462d95b91e63e23 0000-0001-7047-0049 Michaela James Michaela James true false d68adb6744707b3bd75e07bd334d0516 0000-0002-9701-5991 Emily Marchant Emily Marchant true false 84f5661b35a729f55047f9e793d8798b 0000-0001-7417-2858 Sinead Brophy Sinead Brophy true false 2021-10-18 HDAT Objectives: This study aimed to explore the relationship between initial school closures and children’s health by comparing health and well-being outcomes collected during school closures (April–June 2020) via HAPPEN (the Health and Attainment of Pupils in a Primary Education Network) with data from the same period in 2019 and 2018 via the HAPPEN Survey. Setting: The study was conducted online with 161 primary schools across Wales involved in the ‘HAPPEN At Home’ Survey. Participants: Data were collected via the ‘HAPPEN At Home’ Survey capturing the typical health behaviours of children aged 8–11 years from 1333 participants across Wales. These data were compared with data in 2018 and 2019 also collected between April and June, from HAPPEN (2019 (n=1150) and 2018 (n=475)). Primary and secondary outcome measures: Primary outcomes included validated measures of physical activity, screen time, diet and dental health, as well as well-being, competency and autonomy. Free school meal (FSM) status was used as a proxy for socioeconomic deprivation. Analyses were repeated stratifying by FSM. Results: Comparing responses between April–June in 2020 (n=1068), 2019 (n=1150) and 2018 (n=475), there were improvements in physical activity levels, sleep time, happiness and general well-being for children during school closures compared with previous years. However, children on FSM ate fewer fruits and vegetables (21% less at five or more portions of fruits and vegetables (95% CI: 5.7% to 37%)) and had lower self-assessed school competence compared with 2019. Compared with those not on FSM, they also spent less time doing physical activity (13.03%, 95% CI: 3.3% to 21.7%) and consumed more takeaways (16.3%, 95% CI: 2% to 30%) during school closures. Conclusions: This study suggests that schools are important in reducing inequalities in physical health. The physical health (eg, physical activity and diet) of children eligible for FSM may be affected by prolonged school closures. Journal Article BMJ Open 11 10 e051574 BMJ 2044-6055 2044-6055 Public health, 1506, 2474, 1724, COVID-19, public health, community child health 8 10 2021 2021-10-08 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-051574 COLLEGE NANME Health Data Science COLLEGE CODE HDAT Swansea University National Centre for Population Health and Wellbeing Research (NCPHWR) 2021-11-03T12:30:12.0222169 2021-10-18T15:37:37.9810768 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Michaela James 0000-0001-7047-0049 1 Emily Marchant 0000-0002-9701-5991 2 Margaret Anne Defeyter 3 Jayne Woodside 4 Sinead Brophy 0000-0001-7417-2858 5 58392__21215__d292de8f1f6541488f816770f60797d8.pdf bmjopen-2021-051574.pdf 2021-10-18T15:37:37.9810271 Output 480841 application/pdf Version of Record true © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
title Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)
spellingShingle Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)
Michaela, James
Emily, Marchant
Sinead, Brophy
title_short Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)
title_full Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)
title_fullStr Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)
title_full_unstemmed Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)
title_sort Impact of school closures on the health and well-being of primary school children in Wales UK: a routine data linkage study using the HAPPEN Survey (2018–2020)
author_id_str_mv 9a717d184fb8f768e462d95b91e63e23
d68adb6744707b3bd75e07bd334d0516
84f5661b35a729f55047f9e793d8798b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9a717d184fb8f768e462d95b91e63e23_***_Michaela, James_***_0000-0001-7047-0049
d68adb6744707b3bd75e07bd334d0516_***_Emily, Marchant_***_0000-0002-9701-5991
84f5661b35a729f55047f9e793d8798b_***_Sinead, Brophy_***_0000-0001-7417-2858
author Michaela, James
Emily, Marchant
Sinead, Brophy
author2 Michaela James
Emily Marchant
Margaret Anne Defeyter
Jayne Woodside
Sinead Brophy
format Journal article
container_title BMJ Open
container_volume 11
container_issue 10
container_start_page e051574
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 2044-6055
2044-6055
doi_str_mv 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-051574
publisher BMJ
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Objectives: This study aimed to explore the relationship between initial school closures and children’s health by comparing health and well-being outcomes collected during school closures (April–June 2020) via HAPPEN (the Health and Attainment of Pupils in a Primary Education Network) with data from the same period in 2019 and 2018 via the HAPPEN Survey. Setting: The study was conducted online with 161 primary schools across Wales involved in the ‘HAPPEN At Home’ Survey. Participants: Data were collected via the ‘HAPPEN At Home’ Survey capturing the typical health behaviours of children aged 8–11 years from 1333 participants across Wales. These data were compared with data in 2018 and 2019 also collected between April and June, from HAPPEN (2019 (n=1150) and 2018 (n=475)). Primary and secondary outcome measures: Primary outcomes included validated measures of physical activity, screen time, diet and dental health, as well as well-being, competency and autonomy. Free school meal (FSM) status was used as a proxy for socioeconomic deprivation. Analyses were repeated stratifying by FSM. Results: Comparing responses between April–June in 2020 (n=1068), 2019 (n=1150) and 2018 (n=475), there were improvements in physical activity levels, sleep time, happiness and general well-being for children during school closures compared with previous years. However, children on FSM ate fewer fruits and vegetables (21% less at five or more portions of fruits and vegetables (95% CI: 5.7% to 37%)) and had lower self-assessed school competence compared with 2019. Compared with those not on FSM, they also spent less time doing physical activity (13.03%, 95% CI: 3.3% to 21.7%) and consumed more takeaways (16.3%, 95% CI: 2% to 30%) during school closures. Conclusions: This study suggests that schools are important in reducing inequalities in physical health. The physical health (eg, physical activity and diet) of children eligible for FSM may be affected by prolonged school closures.
published_date 2021-10-08T04:28:30Z
_version_ 1723080597421686784
score 10.853351