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COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register

Rod Middleton Orcid Logo, Elaine Craig, Jeff Rodgers, Katherine Tuite-Dalton, A Garjani, N Evangelou, R das Nair, Rachael Hunter, EC Tallantyre, M Cauchi, C Cairn, D Paling, S Fuller, G McDonnell, K Petheram, B Liu, U Nock, Gillian Ingram, W Brownlee, J Taylor, R Nicholas

Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, Volume: 56, Start page: 103317

Swansea University Authors: Rod Middleton Orcid Logo, Elaine Craig , Jeff Rodgers , Katherine Tuite-Dalton , Rachael Hunter , Gillian Ingram

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Abstract

BackgroundIn March 2020, the United Kingdom Multiple Sclerosis Register (UKMSR) established an electronic case return form, designed collaboratively by MS neurologists, to record data about COVID-19 infections in people with MS (pwMS).ObjectivesExamine how hospital admission and mortality are affect...

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Published in: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders
ISSN: 2211-0348
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
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Regression models were tested for predictors of hospitalisation and mortality outcomes. Separate analyzes compared the first and second &#x2018;waves&#x2019; of the pandemic.ResultsUnivariable analysis found hospitalisation and mortality were associated with increasing age, male gender, comorbidities, severe disability, and progressive MS; severe disability showed the highest magnitude of association. Being on a DMT was associated with a small, lower risk. Multivariable analysis found only age and male gender were significant. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that factors were significant for hospitalisation but not mortality. In the second wave, hospitalisation and mortality were lower. Separate models of the first and second wave using age and gender found they had a more important role in the second wave.ConclusionsFeatures associated with poor outcome in COVID-19 are similar to other populations and being on a DMT was not found to be associated with adverse outcomes, consistent with smaller studies. Once in hospital, no factors were predictive of mortality. 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spelling 2021-11-03T12:12:54.3430513 v2 58395 2021-10-18 COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register 005518f819ef1a2a13fdf438529bdfcd 0000-0002-2130-4420 Rod Middleton Rod Middleton true false 99f62fa657546df3f118c712d18e5595 Elaine Craig Elaine Craig true false 3ee27bde2acae56844ecdcbb563218ac Jeff Rodgers Jeff Rodgers true false 2e25da269f03da81184357bb0ef8623d Katherine Tuite-Dalton Katherine Tuite-Dalton true false 677f0b38990c50c0cc8496382b2e44fc Rachael Hunter Rachael Hunter true false 667b7a198b4bc3334a9811953e12cc0e Gillian Ingram Gillian Ingram true false 2021-10-18 HDAT BackgroundIn March 2020, the United Kingdom Multiple Sclerosis Register (UKMSR) established an electronic case return form, designed collaboratively by MS neurologists, to record data about COVID-19 infections in people with MS (pwMS).ObjectivesExamine how hospital admission and mortality are affected by disability, age and disease modifying treatments (DMTs) in people with Multiple Sclerosis with COVID-19.MethodsAnonymised data were submitted by clinical teams. Regression models were tested for predictors of hospitalisation and mortality outcomes. Separate analyzes compared the first and second ‘waves’ of the pandemic.ResultsUnivariable analysis found hospitalisation and mortality were associated with increasing age, male gender, comorbidities, severe disability, and progressive MS; severe disability showed the highest magnitude of association. Being on a DMT was associated with a small, lower risk. Multivariable analysis found only age and male gender were significant. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that factors were significant for hospitalisation but not mortality. In the second wave, hospitalisation and mortality were lower. Separate models of the first and second wave using age and gender found they had a more important role in the second wave.ConclusionsFeatures associated with poor outcome in COVID-19 are similar to other populations and being on a DMT was not found to be associated with adverse outcomes, consistent with smaller studies. Once in hospital, no factors were predictive of mortality. Reassuringly, mortality appears lower in the second wave. Journal Article Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders 56 103317 Elsevier BV 2211-0348 1 11 2021 2021-11-01 10.1016/j.msard.2021.103317 COLLEGE NANME Health Data Science COLLEGE CODE HDAT Swansea University SU College/Department paid the OA fee Multiple Sclerosis Society, grant number: MSREG-001 2021-11-03T12:12:54.3430513 2021-10-18T16:00:24.1669558 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Rod Middleton 0000-0002-2130-4420 1 Elaine Craig 2 Jeff Rodgers 3 Katherine Tuite-Dalton 4 A Garjani 5 N Evangelou 6 R das Nair 7 Rachael Hunter 8 EC Tallantyre 9 M Cauchi 10 C Cairn 11 D Paling 12 S Fuller 13 G McDonnell 14 K Petheram 15 B Liu 16 U Nock 17 Gillian Ingram 18 W Brownlee 19 J Taylor 20 R Nicholas 21 58395__21219__f0e07b791af642228a2d01cf77a6574e.pdf PIIS2211034821005848.pdf 2021-10-18T16:09:28.9928595 Output 976902 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
title COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register
spellingShingle COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register
Rod, Middleton
Elaine, Craig
Jeff, Rodgers
Katherine, Tuite-Dalton
Rachael, Hunter
Gillian, Ingram
title_short COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register
title_full COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register
title_fullStr COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register
title_full_unstemmed COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register
title_sort COVID-19 in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinically reported outcomes from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Register
author_id_str_mv 005518f819ef1a2a13fdf438529bdfcd
99f62fa657546df3f118c712d18e5595
3ee27bde2acae56844ecdcbb563218ac
2e25da269f03da81184357bb0ef8623d
677f0b38990c50c0cc8496382b2e44fc
667b7a198b4bc3334a9811953e12cc0e
author_id_fullname_str_mv 005518f819ef1a2a13fdf438529bdfcd_***_Rod, Middleton_***_0000-0002-2130-4420
99f62fa657546df3f118c712d18e5595_***_Elaine, Craig_***_
3ee27bde2acae56844ecdcbb563218ac_***_Jeff, Rodgers_***_
2e25da269f03da81184357bb0ef8623d_***_Katherine, Tuite-Dalton_***_
677f0b38990c50c0cc8496382b2e44fc_***_Rachael, Hunter_***_
667b7a198b4bc3334a9811953e12cc0e_***_Gillian, Ingram_***_
author Rod, Middleton
Elaine, Craig
Jeff, Rodgers
Katherine, Tuite-Dalton
Rachael, Hunter
Gillian, Ingram
author2 Rod Middleton
Elaine Craig
Jeff Rodgers
Katherine Tuite-Dalton
A Garjani
N Evangelou
R das Nair
Rachael Hunter
EC Tallantyre
M Cauchi
C Cairn
D Paling
S Fuller
G McDonnell
K Petheram
B Liu
U Nock
Gillian Ingram
W Brownlee
J Taylor
R Nicholas
format Journal article
container_title Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders
container_volume 56
container_start_page 103317
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 2211-0348
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.msard.2021.103317
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description BackgroundIn March 2020, the United Kingdom Multiple Sclerosis Register (UKMSR) established an electronic case return form, designed collaboratively by MS neurologists, to record data about COVID-19 infections in people with MS (pwMS).ObjectivesExamine how hospital admission and mortality are affected by disability, age and disease modifying treatments (DMTs) in people with Multiple Sclerosis with COVID-19.MethodsAnonymised data were submitted by clinical teams. Regression models were tested for predictors of hospitalisation and mortality outcomes. Separate analyzes compared the first and second ‘waves’ of the pandemic.ResultsUnivariable analysis found hospitalisation and mortality were associated with increasing age, male gender, comorbidities, severe disability, and progressive MS; severe disability showed the highest magnitude of association. Being on a DMT was associated with a small, lower risk. Multivariable analysis found only age and male gender were significant. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that factors were significant for hospitalisation but not mortality. In the second wave, hospitalisation and mortality were lower. Separate models of the first and second wave using age and gender found they had a more important role in the second wave.ConclusionsFeatures associated with poor outcome in COVID-19 are similar to other populations and being on a DMT was not found to be associated with adverse outcomes, consistent with smaller studies. Once in hospital, no factors were predictive of mortality. Reassuringly, mortality appears lower in the second wave.
published_date 2021-11-01T04:29:16Z
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