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The Effect of Self-Efficacy on Visual Discrimination Sensitivity

George Zacharopoulos, Nicola Binetti, Vincent Walsh, Ryota Kanai

PLoS ONE, Volume: 9, Issue: 10, Start page: e109392

Swansea University Author: George Zacharopoulos

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Abstract

Can subjective belief about one's own perceptual competence change one's perception? To address this question, we investigated the influence of self-efficacy on sensory discrimination in two low-level visual tasks: contrast and orientation discrimination. We utilised a pre-post manipulatio...

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Published in: PLoS ONE
ISSN: 1932-6203
Published: Public Library of Science (PLoS) 2014
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58967
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Abstract: Can subjective belief about one's own perceptual competence change one's perception? To address this question, we investigated the influence of self-efficacy on sensory discrimination in two low-level visual tasks: contrast and orientation discrimination. We utilised a pre-post manipulation approach whereby two experimental groups (high and low self-efficacy) and a control group made objective perceptual judgments on the contrast or the orientation of the visual stimuli. High and low self-efficacy were induced by the provision of fake social-comparative performance feedback and fictional research findings. Subsequently, the post-manipulation phase was performed to assess changes in visual discrimination thresholds as a function of the self-efficacy manipulations. The results showed that the high self-efficacy group demonstrated greater improvement in visual discrimination sensitivity compared to both the low self-efficacy and control groups. These findings suggest that subjective beliefs about one's own perceptual competence can affect low-level visual processing.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: PRESTO grant from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)
Issue: 10
Start Page: e109392