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A global synthesis of fire effects on ecosystem services of forests and woodlands

Jose Roces, Cristina Santin Nuno, Jordi Martínez‐Vilalta, Stefan Doerr Orcid Logo

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Volume: 20, Issue: 3, Pages: 170 - 178

Swansea University Authors: Jose Roces, Cristina Santin Nuno, Stefan Doerr Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/fee.2349

Abstract

Fire is a primary disturbance in the world’s forested ecosystems and its impacts are projected to increase in many regions due to global climate change. Fire impacts have been studied for decades, but integrative assessments of its effects on multiple ecosystem services (ES) across scales are rare....

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Published in: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
ISSN: 1540-9295 1540-9309
Published: Wiley 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59003
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Abstract: Fire is a primary disturbance in the world’s forested ecosystems and its impacts are projected to increase in many regions due to global climate change. Fire impacts have been studied for decades, but integrative assessments of its effects on multiple ecosystem services (ES) across scales are rare. We conducted a global analysis of persistent (>1 year) fire effects on eight ES reported over the past 30 years, evaluating qualitative and quantitative information from 207 peer-reviewed studies. Significant effects were predominantly positive for “water provision” and negative for “water quality”, “climate regulation”, and “erosion control”; for “food provision” and “soil fertility”, no overall significant effects emerged; and for “recreation” or “pollination”, data were insufficient. These effects were generally short-lived (1–2 years) and were more common after wildfires than after prescribed burns. However, available data were primarily derived from only a few countries/biomes and extended only over short time periods, highlighting the need for future research focusing on underrepresented regions and biomes, more extensive timeframes, and multiple ES.
Keywords: Forest ecosystems, Wildfires
College: College of Science
Funders: Government of Asturias and the FP7-Marie Curie-COFUND program of the European Commission (grant “Clarín” ACA17-02) by a “Juan de la Cierva” fellowship (IJCI-2019-038826-I) from the Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities of the Spanish Government; Sêr Cymru Fellowship co-funded by the EU Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement 663830); EU-H2020 COST Action FIRELinks (CA18135).
Issue: 3
Start Page: 170
End Page: 178