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Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder / IMOGEN HOPKINS

Swansea University Author: IMOGEN HOPKINS

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Abstract

This thesis aimed to identify measures vulnerable to stress and identify whether active inhibition task performance was associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms or personality traits. The discovery of measures of psychological processes affected by PTSD symptoms is particularly...

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Published: Swansea 2021
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Master of Research
Degree name: MSc by Research
Supervisor: Gray, Nicola S. ; Snowden, Robert ; Bennett Paul ; Rees, Nigel
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59005
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first_indexed 2021-12-14T12:13:56Z
last_indexed 2021-12-15T04:28:58Z
id cronfa59005
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spelling 2021-12-14T12:25:07.8151781 v2 59005 2021-12-14 Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder d1ce95c578b563d2b880e4ca9d193c45 IMOGEN HOPKINS IMOGEN HOPKINS true false 2021-12-14 This thesis aimed to identify measures vulnerable to stress and identify whether active inhibition task performance was associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms or personality traits. The discovery of measures of psychological processes affected by PTSD symptoms is particularly useful for situations where self-report measures are less suitable. Chapter One reviewed several physiological and psychological measures of stress and PTSD. Chapter Two presented the results of a pilot laboratory study (N = 53) which investigated four different measures purported to be sensitive to stress (heart rate, heart rate variability, latent inhibition, and active inhibition). Due to restrictions imposed by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, this study was terminated prior to completion of data collection. Despite this, both heart rate and heart rate variability were found to be significantly affected by the two stressors (a number task and video clip). This supported the use of these measures for assessing stress response. Latent inhibition appeared unaffected by stress, although the active inhibition results were unclear, possibly due to the small sample size. Chapter Three detailed a novel online study (N = 360) that investigated how PTSD symptoms and personality traits affected performance on an active inhibition task. Online research was adopted due to ongoing restrictions. An active inhibition task was completed, followed by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and PTSD Checklist for DSM-5. Contrary to expectations, PTSD symptoms were positively correlated with increased active inhibition, with avoidance having the strongest correlation. Individuals who met the criteria for PTSD showed greater active inhibition, than those below criteria threshold. No effect was found for any personality traits. Chapter Four discussed the finding of this research which suggest PTSD may not always be associated with inhibition deficits and the active inhibition task may have been highlighted as a measurement of inhibitory processing differences associated with PTSD symptoms. E-Thesis Swansea stress, post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD, active inhibition, latent inhibition, personality 14 12 2021 2021-12-14 COLLEGE NANME COLLEGE CODE Swansea University Gray, Nicola S. ; Snowden, Robert ; Bennett Paul ; Rees, Nigel Master of Research MSc by Research KESS Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships (KESS 2 East) 2021-12-14T12:25:07.8151781 2021-12-14T12:11:05.3587988 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology IMOGEN HOPKINS 1 59005__21881__868251caa4784a3fb7c365f2a22606e1.pdf Hopkins_Imogen_MSc_by_Research_Thesis_Final_Redacted_Signature.pdf 2021-12-14T12:20:14.0267899 Output 3334840 application/pdf E-Thesis – open access true Copyright: The author, Imogen F. Hopkins, 2021. true eng
title Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
spellingShingle Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
IMOGEN HOPKINS
title_short Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
title_full Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
title_fullStr Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
title_full_unstemmed Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
title_sort Evaluating Measures of Stress and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
author_id_str_mv d1ce95c578b563d2b880e4ca9d193c45
author_id_fullname_str_mv d1ce95c578b563d2b880e4ca9d193c45_***_IMOGEN HOPKINS
author IMOGEN HOPKINS
author2 IMOGEN HOPKINS
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institution Swansea University
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description This thesis aimed to identify measures vulnerable to stress and identify whether active inhibition task performance was associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms or personality traits. The discovery of measures of psychological processes affected by PTSD symptoms is particularly useful for situations where self-report measures are less suitable. Chapter One reviewed several physiological and psychological measures of stress and PTSD. Chapter Two presented the results of a pilot laboratory study (N = 53) which investigated four different measures purported to be sensitive to stress (heart rate, heart rate variability, latent inhibition, and active inhibition). Due to restrictions imposed by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, this study was terminated prior to completion of data collection. Despite this, both heart rate and heart rate variability were found to be significantly affected by the two stressors (a number task and video clip). This supported the use of these measures for assessing stress response. Latent inhibition appeared unaffected by stress, although the active inhibition results were unclear, possibly due to the small sample size. Chapter Three detailed a novel online study (N = 360) that investigated how PTSD symptoms and personality traits affected performance on an active inhibition task. Online research was adopted due to ongoing restrictions. An active inhibition task was completed, followed by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and PTSD Checklist for DSM-5. Contrary to expectations, PTSD symptoms were positively correlated with increased active inhibition, with avoidance having the strongest correlation. Individuals who met the criteria for PTSD showed greater active inhibition, than those below criteria threshold. No effect was found for any personality traits. Chapter Four discussed the finding of this research which suggest PTSD may not always be associated with inhibition deficits and the active inhibition task may have been highlighted as a measurement of inhibitory processing differences associated with PTSD symptoms.
published_date 2021-12-14T04:16:41Z
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