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Investigating the Climate-Growth Response of Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Northern Poland

Nella Waszak, Iain Robertson Orcid Logo, Radosław Puchałka, Rajmund Przybylak, Aleksandra Pospieszyńska, Marcin Koprowski

Atmosphere, Volume: 12, Issue: 12, Start page: 1690

Swansea University Author: Iain Robertson Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/atmos12121690

Abstract

Research Highlights: This study used a 99-year time-series of daily climatic data to determine the climate-growth relationship for Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Northern Poland. The use of daily climatic data improved the calculated climatic response of the trees. Background and Object...

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Published in: Atmosphere
ISSN: 2073-4433
Published: MDPI AG 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59024
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Abstract: Research Highlights: This study used a 99-year time-series of daily climatic data to determine the climate-growth relationship for Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Northern Poland. The use of daily climatic data improved the calculated climatic response of the trees. Background and Objectives: It was hypothesised that daily temperature and precipitation data would more precisely identify climate–growth relationships than monthly data. We compared our results to a previous study conducted in the 1990s that utilised monthly precipitation and temperature data. Materials and Methods: The chronology construction and data analyses were performed using CooRecorder, CDendro and R packages (dplR, treeclim, dendrotools). Forty-nine cores from 31 trees were included in the final chronology. Results: The precipitation and temperature of March had the strongest influence upon ring-widths. Despite a statistically significant correlation between monthly temperature and ring-widths, reduction of error (RE) and coefficient of efficiency (CE) statistics confirmed that daily data better describe the effect of climate on tree rings width than monthly data. Conclusions: At this site, the growing season of Scots pine has changed with the observed association with precipitation now starting as early as February–March and extending to June–July.
Keywords: dendroclimatology; daily climate data; monthly climate data; tree rings
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: NCN project no. DEC 2020/37/B/ST10/00710). The research was fund by the Nicolaus Copernicus University–Emerging field: Global Environmental Changes; Department of Ecology and Biogeography and Academia Copernicana.
Issue: 12
Start Page: 1690