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Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?

Alastair Reed Orcid Logo, Adam Henschke

Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications, Pages: 175 - 198

Swansea University Author: Alastair Reed Orcid Logo

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Abstract

As liberal democracies grapple with the evolution of online political extremism, in addition to governments, social media and internet infrastructure companies have found themselves making more and more decisions about who gets to use their platforms, and what people say online. This raises the ques...

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Published in: Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications
ISBN: 9783030902209 9783030902216
ISSN: 1613-5113 2363-9466
Published: Cham Springer International Publishing 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59041
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first_indexed 2021-12-28T18:02:21Z
last_indexed 2022-01-05T04:27:51Z
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spelling 2022-01-04T16:57:00.4458466 v2 59041 2021-12-28 Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online? 115297b63e005e2b75991efe269cd4a2 0000-0002-9060-5518 Alastair Reed Alastair Reed true false 2021-12-28 LAWD As liberal democracies grapple with the evolution of online political extremism, in addition to governments, social media and internet infrastructure companies have found themselves making more and more decisions about who gets to use their platforms, and what people say online. This raises the question that this paper explores, who should regulate extremist content online? In doing so the first part of the paper examines the evolution of the increasing role that social media and internet infrastructure companies have come to play in the regulating extremist content online, and the ethical challenges this presents. The second part of the paper explores three ethical challenges: i) the moral legitimacy of private actors, ii) the concentration of power in the hands of a few actors and iii) the lack of separation of powers in the content regulation process by private actors. Book chapter Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications 175 198 Springer International Publishing Cham 9783030902209 9783030902216 1613-5113 2363-9466 15 12 2021 2021-12-15 10.1007/978-3-030-90221-6_11 COLLEGE NANME Law COLLEGE CODE LAWD Swansea University Another institution paid the OA fee 2022-01-04T16:57:00.4458466 2021-12-28T17:54:21.9534365 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Criminology Alastair Reed 0000-0002-9060-5518 1 Adam Henschke 2 59041__21941__0b5df5396d66405fbcabea54f3112673.pdf Reed-Henschke2021_Chapter_WhoShouldRegulateExtremistCont.pdf 2021-12-28T18:01:41.3198523 Output 331553 application/pdf Version of Record true This chapter is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?
spellingShingle Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?
Alastair Reed
title_short Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?
title_full Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?
title_fullStr Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?
title_full_unstemmed Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?
title_sort Who Should Regulate Extremist Content Online?
author_id_str_mv 115297b63e005e2b75991efe269cd4a2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 115297b63e005e2b75991efe269cd4a2_***_Alastair Reed
author Alastair Reed
author2 Alastair Reed
Adam Henschke
format Book chapter
container_title Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications
container_start_page 175
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
isbn 9783030902209
9783030902216
issn 1613-5113
2363-9466
doi_str_mv 10.1007/978-3-030-90221-6_11
publisher Springer International Publishing
college_str Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_top_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
hierarchy_parent_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_parent_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
department_str Criminology{{{_:::_}}}Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law{{{_:::_}}}Criminology
document_store_str 1
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description As liberal democracies grapple with the evolution of online political extremism, in addition to governments, social media and internet infrastructure companies have found themselves making more and more decisions about who gets to use their platforms, and what people say online. This raises the question that this paper explores, who should regulate extremist content online? In doing so the first part of the paper examines the evolution of the increasing role that social media and internet infrastructure companies have come to play in the regulating extremist content online, and the ethical challenges this presents. The second part of the paper explores three ethical challenges: i) the moral legitimacy of private actors, ii) the concentration of power in the hands of a few actors and iii) the lack of separation of powers in the content regulation process by private actors.
published_date 2021-12-15T04:16:03Z
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score 10.88812