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Factors influencing wellbeing in young people during COVID-19: A survey with 6291 young people in Wales

Michaela James Orcid Logo, Hope Jones, Amana Baig, Emily Marchant Orcid Logo, Tegan Waites, Charlotte Todd, Karen Hughes, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo

PLOS ONE, Volume: 16, Issue: 12, Start page: e0260640

Swansea University Authors: Michaela James Orcid Logo, Hope Jones, Emily Marchant Orcid Logo, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo

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Abstract

COVID-19 infection and the resultant restrictions has impacted all aspects of life across the world. This study explores factors that promote or support wellbeing for young people during the pandemic, how they differ by age, using a self-reported online survey with those aged 8–25 in Wales between S...

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Published in: PLOS ONE
ISSN: 1932-6203
Published: Public Library of Science (PLoS) 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59046
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Abstract: COVID-19 infection and the resultant restrictions has impacted all aspects of life across the world. This study explores factors that promote or support wellbeing for young people during the pandemic, how they differ by age, using a self-reported online survey with those aged 8–25 in Wales between September 2020 and February 2021. Open-ended responses were analysed via thematic analysis to provide further context. A total of 6,291 responses were obtained from 81 education settings across Wales (including primary and secondary schools as well as sixth form, colleges and universities). Wellbeing was highest in primary school children and boys and lowest in those who were at secondary school children, who were girls and, those who preferred not to give a gender. Among primary school children, higher wellbeing was seen for those who played with lots of others (rather than alone), were of Asian ethnicity (OR 2.17, 95% CI: 1.26 to 4.3), had a safe play area (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.67 to 2.56) and had more sleep. To support their wellbeing young people reported they would like to be able to play with their friends more. Among secondary school children those who were of mixed ethnicity reported lower wellbeing (OR: 5.14, 95% CI: 1.68 to 15.79). To support their wellbeing they reported they would like more support with mental health (due to anxiety and pressure to achieve when learning online). This study found self-reported wellbeing differed by gender, ethnicity and deprivation and found younger children report the need for play and to see friends to support wellbeing but older children/young people wanted more support with anxiety and educational pressures.
College: Swansea University Medical School
Funders: National Centre for Population Health and Wellbeing Research (NCPHWR)
Issue: 12
Start Page: e0260640