No Cover Image

Journal article 84 views 27 downloads

What Does a Systems Approach to Quality Improvement Look Like in Practice?

Sharon Williams Orcid Logo, Stephanie Best

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume: 19, Issue: 2, Start page: 747

Swansea University Authors: Sharon Williams Orcid Logo, Stephanie Best

  • 59185.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © 2022 by the authors. This is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license

    Download (348.25KB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ijerph19020747

Abstract

Universally improving healthcare systems is difficult to achieve in practice with organisations implementing a range of quality improvement (QI) approaches, in varying and changing contexts, and efforts ranging from project-based improvements to whole system change. This study aimed to identify how...

Full description

Published in: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1660-4601
Published: MDPI AG 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59185
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Universally improving healthcare systems is difficult to achieve in practice with organisations implementing a range of quality improvement (QI) approaches, in varying and changing contexts, and efforts ranging from project-based improvements to whole system change. This study aimed to identify how organisations overcome the challenges to improving the quality of the services they deliver. Drawing on the eight challenges from the ‘Quality and Safety in Europe by Research (QUASER) hospital guide, we assessed eight cases reported by the UK-based regulator Care Quality Commission as improving their performance. A thematic analysis of these secondary data established that all eight challenges had been addressed or considered in varying degrees. Education and physical and technological challenges seemed less prominent than developments made to address other challenges such as developing leadership, structure, and culture to support improving quality. This paper relies on the analysis of secondary case data and one framework to assess improvement efforts. Further research is required to consider other models and frameworks and to collate longitudinal data to capture the dynamics and increasing the maturity of improving healthcare systems in practice.
Keywords: health systems, quality improvement, QUASER, process improvement, systems thinking, NHS
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 2
Start Page: 747