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Inspiratory Muscle Training Enhances Recovery Post COVID-19: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo, Ronan M G Berg, James Shelley, Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo, Zoe L Saynor, Jamie Duckers Orcid Logo, Keir Lewis, Gwyneth Davies Orcid Logo, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, James Shelley

European Respiratory Journal, Volume: 59, Issue: 6

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo, James Shelley, Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo, Gwyneth Davies Orcid Logo, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, James Shelley

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Abstract

Background: Many people recovering from COVID-19 experience prolonged symptoms, particularly breathlessness. We urgently need to identify safe and effective COVID-19 rehabilitative strategies. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential rehabilitative role of inspiratory muscle tra...

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Published in: European Respiratory Journal
ISSN: 0903-1936 1399-3003
Published: European Respiratory Society (ERS)
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59407
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Abstract: Background: Many people recovering from COVID-19 experience prolonged symptoms, particularly breathlessness. We urgently need to identify safe and effective COVID-19 rehabilitative strategies. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential rehabilitative role of inspiratory muscle training (IMT).Methods: 281 adults (46.6±12.2 years; 88% female) recovering from self-reported COVID-19 (9.0±4.2 months post-acute infection) were randomized 4:1 to an eight-week IMT or a “usual care” wait list control arm. Health-related quality of life and breathlessness questionnaires (King’s Brief Interstitial Lung Disease (KBILD) and Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI)), respiratory muscle strength and fitness (Chester Step Test) were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The primary endpoint was KBILD total score, with the KBILD subdomains and TDI being key secondary outcomes. Results: According to intention to treat (ITT), there was no difference between groups in KBILD total score post-intervention (Control: 59.5±12.4; IMT: 58.2±12.3; P<0.05) but IMT elicited clinically meaningful improvements in the KBILD subdomains of breathlessness (Control: 59.8±12.6; IMT: 62.2±16.2; P<0.05) and chest symptoms (Control: 59.2±18.7; IMT: 64.5±18.2; P<0.05), along with clinically meaningful improvements in breathlessness according to TDI (Control: 0.9 ± 1.7 vs. 2.0 ± 2.0; P<0.05). IMT also improved respiratory muscle strength and estimated aerobic fitness. Conclusions: IMT may represent an important home-based rehabilitation strategy for wider implementation as part of COVID-19 rehabilitative strategies. Given the diverse nature of long-COVID, further research is warranted on the individual responses to rehabilitation - the withdrawal rate herein highlights that no one strategy is likely to be appropriate for all.
Keywords: Long COVID; breathlessness; dyspnoea; fitness; physical activity; post-COVID; quality of life
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 6