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Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites

Emma Quinn, Jess Bevan, Sophie Malkin, Molly Eley, Christopher Coates, Andrew Rowley

Parasitology, Volume: 149, Issue: 6, Pages: 811 - 819

Swansea University Authors: Emma Quinn, Jess Bevan, Sophie Malkin, Molly Eley, Christopher Coates, Andrew Rowley

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Abstract

Invasion and spread of alien species can drive ecosystem changes, such as, the dynamics ofinfectious diseases. The non-native, marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata has become established across European coastlines over the last century, but there remains little insight into itsdisease carrying capac...

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Published in: Parasitology
ISSN: 0031-1820 1469-8161
Published: Cambridge University Press (CUP) 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59521
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The non-native, marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata has become established across European coastlines over the last century, but there remains little insight into itsdisease carrying capacity and potential role as a source/sink of parasites. To address thisknowledge gap, we surveyed limpets from two sites in South Wales, UK for signatures of disease/pathology using polymerase chain reaction-based methods (haemolymph) and histology(solid tissue). We encountered trematode-like parasites in ∼1% individuals (5 out of 462).Three limpets displayed gross damage in the gonad, i.e. castration, and encysted metacercariaewere found in the muscle of two other individuals. On the basis of 28S rDNA and internaltranscribed spacer 2 genomic targets, we identified the gonad-infecting trematodes asmembers of the family Microphallidae – putative novel species related to the genusLongiductotrema. Earlier reports suggest that C. fornicata is not a host for trematodeparasites in either its native or alien range but may act as a sink due to its filter feedinglifestyle. 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spelling v2 59521 2022-03-08 Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites 6cb18d2ebc7cfec175374f0ff559d06b Emma Quinn Emma Quinn true false 11f13b14aed072e93e611759d9aa090f Jess Bevan Jess Bevan true false 17ff4136248e9382802ced1bc1d680e4 Sophie Malkin Sophie Malkin true false 67df415f62420197b03efdd0275a42eb Molly Eley Molly Eley true false af160934b75bea5b8ba83d68b3d1a003 Christopher Coates Christopher Coates true false e98124f6e62b9592786899d7059e3a79 Andrew Rowley Andrew Rowley true false 2022-03-08 SBI Invasion and spread of alien species can drive ecosystem changes, such as, the dynamics ofinfectious diseases. The non-native, marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata has become established across European coastlines over the last century, but there remains little insight into itsdisease carrying capacity and potential role as a source/sink of parasites. To address thisknowledge gap, we surveyed limpets from two sites in South Wales, UK for signatures of disease/pathology using polymerase chain reaction-based methods (haemolymph) and histology(solid tissue). We encountered trematode-like parasites in ∼1% individuals (5 out of 462).Three limpets displayed gross damage in the gonad, i.e. castration, and encysted metacercariaewere found in the muscle of two other individuals. On the basis of 28S rDNA and internaltranscribed spacer 2 genomic targets, we identified the gonad-infecting trematodes asmembers of the family Microphallidae – putative novel species related to the genusLongiductotrema. Earlier reports suggest that C. fornicata is not a host for trematodeparasites in either its native or alien range but may act as a sink due to its filter feedinglifestyle. We provide clear evidence that C. fornicata is parasitized by at least one trematodespecies at two sites in Wales, UK, and likely act as a spillback or accidental host among nativelittorinids Journal Article Parasitology 149 6 811 819 Cambridge University Press (CUP) 0031-1820 1469-8161 Disease connectivity; epizootiology; invertebrate pathology; microphallids; parasitic castration 1 5 2022 2022-05-01 10.1017/s0031182022000257 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University SU Library paid the OA fee (TA Institutional Deal) Operations were part funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Ireland–Wales Cooperation programme, BLUEFISH, awarded to C. J. C. and A. F. R. A BLUEFISH innovation bursary and a College of Science (Swansea University) doctoral training grant supported E. A. Q. 2022-09-05T11:47:33.1590525 2022-03-08T10:20:19.2575371 College of Science Biosciences Emma Quinn 1 Jess Bevan 2 Sophie Malkin 3 Molly Eley 4 Christopher Coates 5 Andrew Rowley 6 59521__23857__1c489b22012746e6867eb4bf4f910afb.pdf 59521.pdf 2022-04-14T11:55:20.6392003 Output 1123139 application/pdf Version of Record true This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
title Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites
spellingShingle Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites
Emma Quinn
Jess Bevan
Sophie Malkin
Molly Eley
Christopher Coates
Andrew Rowley
title_short Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites
title_full Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites
title_fullStr Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites
title_full_unstemmed Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites
title_sort Invasive slipper limpets <i>Crepidula fornicata</i> are hosts for sterilizing digenean parasites
author_id_str_mv 6cb18d2ebc7cfec175374f0ff559d06b
11f13b14aed072e93e611759d9aa090f
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 6cb18d2ebc7cfec175374f0ff559d06b_***_Emma Quinn
11f13b14aed072e93e611759d9aa090f_***_Jess Bevan
17ff4136248e9382802ced1bc1d680e4_***_Sophie Malkin
67df415f62420197b03efdd0275a42eb_***_Molly Eley
af160934b75bea5b8ba83d68b3d1a003_***_Christopher Coates
e98124f6e62b9592786899d7059e3a79_***_Andrew Rowley
author Emma Quinn
Jess Bevan
Sophie Malkin
Molly Eley
Christopher Coates
Andrew Rowley
author2 Emma Quinn
Jess Bevan
Sophie Malkin
Molly Eley
Christopher Coates
Andrew Rowley
format Journal article
container_title Parasitology
container_volume 149
container_issue 6
container_start_page 811
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 0031-1820
1469-8161
doi_str_mv 10.1017/s0031182022000257
publisher Cambridge University Press (CUP)
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Invasion and spread of alien species can drive ecosystem changes, such as, the dynamics ofinfectious diseases. The non-native, marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata has become established across European coastlines over the last century, but there remains little insight into itsdisease carrying capacity and potential role as a source/sink of parasites. To address thisknowledge gap, we surveyed limpets from two sites in South Wales, UK for signatures of disease/pathology using polymerase chain reaction-based methods (haemolymph) and histology(solid tissue). We encountered trematode-like parasites in ∼1% individuals (5 out of 462).Three limpets displayed gross damage in the gonad, i.e. castration, and encysted metacercariaewere found in the muscle of two other individuals. On the basis of 28S rDNA and internaltranscribed spacer 2 genomic targets, we identified the gonad-infecting trematodes asmembers of the family Microphallidae – putative novel species related to the genusLongiductotrema. Earlier reports suggest that C. fornicata is not a host for trematodeparasites in either its native or alien range but may act as a sink due to its filter feedinglifestyle. We provide clear evidence that C. fornicata is parasitized by at least one trematodespecies at two sites in Wales, UK, and likely act as a spillback or accidental host among nativelittorinids
published_date 2022-05-01T11:47:29Z
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