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Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses

Magali Meniri Orcid Logo, Elsa Evans, Faye J. Thompson Orcid Logo, Harry H. Marshall Orcid Logo, Hazel Nichols Orcid Logo, Gina Lewis, Lauren Holt, Emma Davey, Christopher Mitchell, Rufus A. Johnstone Orcid Logo, Michael A. Cant Orcid Logo, Jonathan D. Blount Orcid Logo

Ecology and Evolution, Volume: 12, Issue: 3, Start page: e8644

Swansea University Authors: Hazel Nichols Orcid Logo, Gina Lewis

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/ece3.8644

Abstract

The cost of reproduction plays a central role in evolutionary theory, but the identity of the underlying mechanisms remains a puzzle. Oxidative stress has been hypothesized to be a proximate mechanism that may explain the cost of reproduction. We examine three pathways by which oxidative stress coul...

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Published in: Ecology and Evolution
ISSN: 2045-7758 2045-7758
Published: Wiley 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59563
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Oxidative stress has been hypothesized to be a proximate mechanism that may explain the cost of reproduction. We examine three pathways by which oxidative stress could shape reproduction. The &#x201C;oxidative cost&#x201D; hypothesis proposes that reproductive effort generates oxidative stress, while the &#x201C;oxidative constraint&#x201D; and &#x201C;oxidative shielding&#x201D; hypotheses suggest that mothers mitigate such costs through reducing reproductive effort or by pre&#x2010;emptively decreasing damage levels, respectively. We tested these three mechanisms using data from a long&#x2010;term food provisioning experiment on wild female banded mongooses (Mungos mungo). Our results show that maternal supplementation did not influence oxidative stress levels, or the production and survival of offspring. However, we found that two of the oxidative mechanisms co&#x2010;occur during reproduction. There was evidence of an oxidative challenge associated with reproduction that mothers attempted to mitigate by reducing damage levels during breeding. This mitigation is likely to be of crucial importance, as long&#x2010;term offspring survival was negatively impacted by maternal oxidative stress. 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spelling 2022-08-05T11:41:18.4237658 v2 59563 2022-03-09 Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses 43ba12986bd7754484874c73eed0ebfe 0000-0002-4455-6065 Hazel Nichols Hazel Nichols true false 0d0629ea78bdba6c2f0762195d24f67b Gina Lewis Gina Lewis true false 2022-03-09 SBI The cost of reproduction plays a central role in evolutionary theory, but the identity of the underlying mechanisms remains a puzzle. Oxidative stress has been hypothesized to be a proximate mechanism that may explain the cost of reproduction. We examine three pathways by which oxidative stress could shape reproduction. The “oxidative cost” hypothesis proposes that reproductive effort generates oxidative stress, while the “oxidative constraint” and “oxidative shielding” hypotheses suggest that mothers mitigate such costs through reducing reproductive effort or by pre‐emptively decreasing damage levels, respectively. We tested these three mechanisms using data from a long‐term food provisioning experiment on wild female banded mongooses (Mungos mungo). Our results show that maternal supplementation did not influence oxidative stress levels, or the production and survival of offspring. However, we found that two of the oxidative mechanisms co‐occur during reproduction. There was evidence of an oxidative challenge associated with reproduction that mothers attempted to mitigate by reducing damage levels during breeding. This mitigation is likely to be of crucial importance, as long‐term offspring survival was negatively impacted by maternal oxidative stress. This study demonstrates the value of longitudinal studies of wild animals in order to highlight the interconnected oxidative mechanisms that shape the cost of reproduction. Journal Article Ecology and Evolution 12 3 e8644 Wiley 2045-7758 2045-7758 constraint; cost; Mungos mungo; oxidative stress; reproduction; shielding 1 2 2022 2022-02-01 10.1002/ece3.8644 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University Natural Environment Research Council Grant: NE/N01117/1 2022-08-05T11:41:18.4237658 2022-03-09T14:32:36.8687358 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences Magali Meniri 0000-0003-0400-3420 1 Elsa Evans 2 Faye J. Thompson 0000-0001-7581-2204 3 Harry H. Marshall 0000-0003-2120-243x 4 Hazel Nichols 0000-0002-4455-6065 5 Gina Lewis 6 Lauren Holt 7 Emma Davey 8 Christopher Mitchell 9 Rufus A. Johnstone 0000-0002-7155-6124 10 Michael A. Cant 0000-0002-1530-3077 11 Jonathan D. Blount 0000-0002-0016-0130 12 59563__22557__4c7ab642aa7a42729f7fc5a0d6da3da7.pdf ece3.8644.pdf 2022-03-09T14:32:36.8512123 Output 1295680 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2022 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses
spellingShingle Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses
Hazel Nichols
Gina Lewis
title_short Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses
title_full Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses
title_fullStr Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses
title_full_unstemmed Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses
title_sort Untangling the oxidative cost of reproduction: An analysis in wild banded mongooses
author_id_str_mv 43ba12986bd7754484874c73eed0ebfe
0d0629ea78bdba6c2f0762195d24f67b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 43ba12986bd7754484874c73eed0ebfe_***_Hazel Nichols
0d0629ea78bdba6c2f0762195d24f67b_***_Gina Lewis
author Hazel Nichols
Gina Lewis
author2 Magali Meniri
Elsa Evans
Faye J. Thompson
Harry H. Marshall
Hazel Nichols
Gina Lewis
Lauren Holt
Emma Davey
Christopher Mitchell
Rufus A. Johnstone
Michael A. Cant
Jonathan D. Blount
format Journal article
container_title Ecology and Evolution
container_volume 12
container_issue 3
container_start_page e8644
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 2045-7758
2045-7758
doi_str_mv 10.1002/ece3.8644
publisher Wiley
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
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department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences
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description The cost of reproduction plays a central role in evolutionary theory, but the identity of the underlying mechanisms remains a puzzle. Oxidative stress has been hypothesized to be a proximate mechanism that may explain the cost of reproduction. We examine three pathways by which oxidative stress could shape reproduction. The “oxidative cost” hypothesis proposes that reproductive effort generates oxidative stress, while the “oxidative constraint” and “oxidative shielding” hypotheses suggest that mothers mitigate such costs through reducing reproductive effort or by pre‐emptively decreasing damage levels, respectively. We tested these three mechanisms using data from a long‐term food provisioning experiment on wild female banded mongooses (Mungos mungo). Our results show that maternal supplementation did not influence oxidative stress levels, or the production and survival of offspring. However, we found that two of the oxidative mechanisms co‐occur during reproduction. There was evidence of an oxidative challenge associated with reproduction that mothers attempted to mitigate by reducing damage levels during breeding. This mitigation is likely to be of crucial importance, as long‐term offspring survival was negatively impacted by maternal oxidative stress. This study demonstrates the value of longitudinal studies of wild animals in order to highlight the interconnected oxidative mechanisms that shape the cost of reproduction.
published_date 2022-02-01T04:16:58Z
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