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50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment

Ruth Callaway

Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Volume: 270, Start page: 107834

Swansea University Author: Ruth Callaway

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Abstract

Bivalve populations are prone to change due to sudden or gradual alteration in the natural environment and anthropogenic interference. Fisheries and environmental managers are therefore interested in long-term trends and disentangling natural and human influences, assisting them in conservation effo...

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Published in: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
ISSN: 0272-7714
Published: Elsevier BV 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59820
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spelling 2022-05-06T14:46:21.0950478 v2 59820 2022-04-13 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment 61d7fe28cbb286de1c9c43f45014c490 Ruth Callaway Ruth Callaway true false 2022-04-13 FGSEN Bivalve populations are prone to change due to sudden or gradual alteration in the natural environment and anthropogenic interference. Fisheries and environmental managers are therefore interested in long-term trends and disentangling natural and human influences, assisting them in conservation efforts and the management of bivalve stocks. Here, 64 monitoring reports covering a 50-year period from 1958 to 2009 of cockles Cerastoderma edule (Linnaeus, 1758) in South Wales, UK, were scrutinised for data on recruitment, growth and mortality. Changes in these population parameters were related to the modernisation of wastewater treatment in 1997, weather and climate variables (temperature, sun hours, air frost days, NAO) and numbers of cockles in the estuary. Recruitment as well as mortalities were high during the first and last decade of the study, and variation was significantly linked to the total number of cockles in the population. Cockle sizes of all cohorts as well as overall biomass declined in the late 1990s. Modernisation of wastewater treatment was significantly related with the downward trend, suggesting that the changed nutrient regime in the estuary may have resulted in reduced food provision for cockles. The average size of newly settled cockles was related to their mortality: the smaller the recruits the higher their mortality. The study indicated a link between the change in wastewater treatment in 1997 and diminishing sizes of cockle recruits that shortened their life span. Survey methods were profoundly changed after 2009, and it is recommended to develop conversion factors between the pre- and post-2009 survey methods. This would allow an extension of the timeline and deeper insight into the long-term impact of the change in wastewater treatment and the recovery of the cockle population. Journal Article Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 270 107834 Elsevier BV 0272-7714 Cerastoderma edule; Cockle; Estuary; Bivalve; Burry inlet; Bivalve mortality; Bivalve growth; Wastewater 5 6 2022 2022-06-05 10.1016/j.ecss.2022.107834 COLLEGE NANME Science and Engineering - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGSEN Swansea University SU Library paid the OA fee (TA Institutional Deal) This study was carried out during the 2020 Covid19 lockdown and did not receive funding. 2022-05-06T14:46:21.0950478 2022-04-13T17:03:11.3008120 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences Ruth Callaway 1 59820__23842__b5781d45c04146f0ba64e252bd1dcab9.pdf 59820.VOR.pdf 2022-04-13T17:09:28.9223885 Output 4687809 application/pdf Version of Record true Distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND) licence. true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
title 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment
spellingShingle 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment
Ruth Callaway
title_short 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment
title_full 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment
title_fullStr 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment
title_full_unstemmed 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment
title_sort 50 years of estuarine cockles (Cerastoderma edule L.): Shifting cohorts, dwindling sizes and the impact of improved wastewater treatment
author_id_str_mv 61d7fe28cbb286de1c9c43f45014c490
author_id_fullname_str_mv 61d7fe28cbb286de1c9c43f45014c490_***_Ruth Callaway
author Ruth Callaway
author2 Ruth Callaway
format Journal article
container_title Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
container_volume 270
container_start_page 107834
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 0272-7714
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.ecss.2022.107834
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
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department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences
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description Bivalve populations are prone to change due to sudden or gradual alteration in the natural environment and anthropogenic interference. Fisheries and environmental managers are therefore interested in long-term trends and disentangling natural and human influences, assisting them in conservation efforts and the management of bivalve stocks. Here, 64 monitoring reports covering a 50-year period from 1958 to 2009 of cockles Cerastoderma edule (Linnaeus, 1758) in South Wales, UK, were scrutinised for data on recruitment, growth and mortality. Changes in these population parameters were related to the modernisation of wastewater treatment in 1997, weather and climate variables (temperature, sun hours, air frost days, NAO) and numbers of cockles in the estuary. Recruitment as well as mortalities were high during the first and last decade of the study, and variation was significantly linked to the total number of cockles in the population. Cockle sizes of all cohorts as well as overall biomass declined in the late 1990s. Modernisation of wastewater treatment was significantly related with the downward trend, suggesting that the changed nutrient regime in the estuary may have resulted in reduced food provision for cockles. The average size of newly settled cockles was related to their mortality: the smaller the recruits the higher their mortality. The study indicated a link between the change in wastewater treatment in 1997 and diminishing sizes of cockle recruits that shortened their life span. Survey methods were profoundly changed after 2009, and it is recommended to develop conversion factors between the pre- and post-2009 survey methods. This would allow an extension of the timeline and deeper insight into the long-term impact of the change in wastewater treatment and the recovery of the cockle population.
published_date 2022-06-05T04:17:24Z
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