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Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence

Aimee Grant Orcid Logo, Sara Jones Orcid Logo, Kathryn Williams Orcid Logo, Jennifer Leigh, Amy Brown Orcid Logo

Autism, Start page: 136236132210893

Swansea University Authors: Aimee Grant Orcid Logo, Sara Jones Orcid Logo, Amy Brown Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Low breastfeeding rates are driven by multiple bio-psycho-social factors. Experience of breastfeeding is known to differ by maternal demographic factors (age, education and ethnicity) but there is less recognition of factors such as neurodivergence. This review, prospectively registered with PROSPER...

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Published in: Autism
ISSN: 1362-3613 1461-7005
Published: SAGE Publications 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59898
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first_indexed 2022-04-25T10:22:20Z
last_indexed 2022-06-09T03:32:28Z
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However, sensory challenges, pain and interoceptive differences (exacerbated by a lack of support) made breastfeeding impossible for some. Infant formula was viewed as second-best to breastmilk, but a minority of mothers found the ritual of preparing bottles of formula positive. 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spelling v2 59898 2022-04-25 Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence 6a1ce3bc54c692c804e858b70d2e4bd2 0000-0001-7205-5869 Aimee Grant Aimee Grant true false e6ed433db8a59b5e3077e3de5888a98a 0000-0003-2182-6314 Sara Jones Sara Jones true false 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3 0000-0002-0438-0157 Amy Brown Amy Brown true false 2022-04-25 PHAC Low breastfeeding rates are driven by multiple bio-psycho-social factors. Experience of breastfeeding is known to differ by maternal demographic factors (age, education and ethnicity) but there is less recognition of factors such as neurodivergence. This review, prospectively registered with PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42021271465), systematically identified qualitative research, commentaries and personal accounts related to Autistic mothers and infant feeding. Database searching identified 1225 records, with thematic synthesis undertaken on 22 (eight peer-reviewed studies and 14 grey literature) pieces. Our analysis identified that maternity and infant feeding services were built on a lack of understanding of Autistic needs, and were often inaccessible at a time when Autistic mothers already felt a loss of control and lack of social support. Specifically relating to breastfeeding, knowledge and determination were often high, and a minority of mothers reported positive breastfeeding experiences. However, sensory challenges, pain and interoceptive differences (exacerbated by a lack of support) made breastfeeding impossible for some. Infant formula was viewed as second-best to breastmilk, but a minority of mothers found the ritual of preparing bottles of formula positive. There is an urgent need for maternity and infant feeding services to accommodate the needs of Autistic mothers, including service design and staff training. Journal Article Autism 0 136236132210893 SAGE Publications 1362-3613 1461-7005 autism, breastfeeding, infant feeding, maternity 12 4 2022 2022-04-12 10.1177/13623613221089374 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University SU College/Department paid the OA fee This systematic review was funded in part by the Research Wales Innovation Fund, who funded Jones’ time. Grant’s post is funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, which also supported Brown’s time on this project. Open access publishing was partially funded through an agreement between Sage and Swansea University. 2022-07-22T15:25:15.9631896 2022-04-25T10:11:18.8449444 College of Human and Health Sciences Public Health and Policy Studies Aimee Grant 0000-0001-7205-5869 1 Sara Jones 0000-0003-2182-6314 2 Kathryn Williams 0000-0001-7274-3493 3 Jennifer Leigh 4 Amy Brown 0000-0002-0438-0157 5 59898__23919__c01013b7fb56452bb4820cfad97fb67b.pdf 59898.pdf 2022-04-27T11:51:18.5202290 Output 495131 application/pdf Version of Record true This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
title Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence
spellingShingle Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence
Aimee Grant
Sara Jones
Amy Brown
title_short Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence
title_full Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence
title_fullStr Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence
title_full_unstemmed Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence
title_sort Autistic women’s views and experiences of infant feeding: A systematic review of qualitative evidence
author_id_str_mv 6a1ce3bc54c692c804e858b70d2e4bd2
e6ed433db8a59b5e3077e3de5888a98a
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 6a1ce3bc54c692c804e858b70d2e4bd2_***_Aimee Grant
e6ed433db8a59b5e3077e3de5888a98a_***_Sara Jones
37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3_***_Amy Brown
author Aimee Grant
Sara Jones
Amy Brown
author2 Aimee Grant
Sara Jones
Kathryn Williams
Jennifer Leigh
Amy Brown
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publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
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1461-7005
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description Low breastfeeding rates are driven by multiple bio-psycho-social factors. Experience of breastfeeding is known to differ by maternal demographic factors (age, education and ethnicity) but there is less recognition of factors such as neurodivergence. This review, prospectively registered with PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42021271465), systematically identified qualitative research, commentaries and personal accounts related to Autistic mothers and infant feeding. Database searching identified 1225 records, with thematic synthesis undertaken on 22 (eight peer-reviewed studies and 14 grey literature) pieces. Our analysis identified that maternity and infant feeding services were built on a lack of understanding of Autistic needs, and were often inaccessible at a time when Autistic mothers already felt a loss of control and lack of social support. Specifically relating to breastfeeding, knowledge and determination were often high, and a minority of mothers reported positive breastfeeding experiences. However, sensory challenges, pain and interoceptive differences (exacerbated by a lack of support) made breastfeeding impossible for some. Infant formula was viewed as second-best to breastmilk, but a minority of mothers found the ritual of preparing bottles of formula positive. There is an urgent need for maternity and infant feeding services to accommodate the needs of Autistic mothers, including service design and staff training.
published_date 2022-04-12T15:25:14Z
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