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Scaling Considerations for Organic Photovoltaics for Indoor Applications

Gregory Burwell Orcid Logo, Oskar Sandberg Orcid Logo, Wei Li, Paul Meredith Orcid Logo, Matt Carnie Orcid Logo, Ardalan Armin Orcid Logo

Solar RRL, Volume: 6, Issue: 7, Start page: 2200315

Swansea University Authors: Gregory Burwell Orcid Logo, Oskar Sandberg Orcid Logo, Wei Li, Paul Meredith Orcid Logo, Matt Carnie Orcid Logo, Ardalan Armin Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/solr.202200315

Abstract

Organic semiconductor-based photovoltaic (OPV) devices have many properties that make them attractive for indoor applications, such as tailorable light absorption, low embodied energy manufacturing and cost, structural conformality, and low material toxicity. Compared to their use as organic solar c...

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Published in: Solar RRL
ISSN: 2367-198X 2367-198X
Published: Wiley 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60153
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Abstract: Organic semiconductor-based photovoltaic (OPV) devices have many properties that make them attractive for indoor applications, such as tailorable light absorption, low embodied energy manufacturing and cost, structural conformality, and low material toxicity. Compared to their use as organic solar cells (OSCs) for standard outdoor solar harvesting, indoor OPV (IOPV) devices operate at low light intensities, and thus demonstrate different area-scaling behavior. In particular, it appears as though the performance of large-area IOPV devices is much less affected by the sheet resistances of the transparent conductive electrodes (a major limit in OSCs), but instead by factors such as their shunt resistance at low light intensities. Herein, the key parameters for improving the efficiency of large-area IOPV using drift–diffusion and finite element modeling (FEM) are examined. The scaling behavior at low-light intensities is theoretically and experimentally probed and demonstrated using the model PM6:Y6 system. The implications for the fabrication of large-area devices and the requirements for high shunt resistances for low-light performance are examined. These new insights present a clear route toward realizing monolithic large-area organic photovoltaic cells for indoor applications – which is a necessary technical step to practical implementation.
Keywords: indoor photovoltaic; non-fullerene acceptors; organic photovoltaic; sheet resistance; shunt resistance
College: College of Science
Funders: European Regional Development Fund; Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. Grant Number: EP/T028511/1
Issue: 7
Start Page: 2200315