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Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis

Yunhan Wu, Martin Porcheron Orcid Logo, Philip Doyle, Justin Edwards, Daniel Rough, Orla Cooney, Anna Bleakley, Leigh Clark Orcid Logo, Benjamin Cowan

4th Conference on Conversational User Interfaces

Swansea University Authors: Martin Porcheron Orcid Logo, Leigh Clark Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1145/3543829.3543839

Abstract

Intelligent Personal Assistants (IPAs) are limited in the languages they support, meaning many people are left to interact using a non-native language. Yet, we know little about how people interact with IPAs in this way. Through a conversation analysis (CA) perspective, we examine native (L1) and no...

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Published in: 4th Conference on Conversational User Interfaces
ISBN: 978-1-4503-9739-1
Published: New York, NY, USA ACM 2022
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60212
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spelling v2 60212 2022-06-14 Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis d9de398c04c0b443d547d455782d5de5 0000-0003-3814-7174 Martin Porcheron Martin Porcheron true false 004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0 0000-0002-9237-1057 Leigh Clark Leigh Clark true false 2022-06-14 SCS Intelligent Personal Assistants (IPAs) are limited in the languages they support, meaning many people are left to interact using a non-native language. Yet, we know little about how people interact with IPAs in this way. Through a conversation analysis (CA) perspective, we examine native (L1) and non-native (L2) English speaker interactions with Google Assistant, comparing how both user groups produce IPA commands. Our work shows that L1 and L2 speakers similarly used pauses, partial or complete repetition, and hyper-articulation when constructing commands. However, L2 speakers tended to experience issues in lexical access, syntactic construction and pronunciation, resulting in the use of code-mixing, increased pause lengths and off-task rehearsal to help generate commands. We consider reasons for such effects, whilst exploring ways to design IPA interaction to ensure it is sensitive to L2 challenges in command production. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 4th Conference on Conversational User Interfaces ACM New York, NY, USA 978-1-4503-9739-1 speech interface, voice user interface, intelligent personal assistants, non-native speakers 15 9 2022 2022-09-15 10.1145/3543829.3543839 COLLEGE NANME Computer Science COLLEGE CODE SCS Swansea University Another institution paid the OA fee This work was conducted with the financial support of the UCD China Scholarship Council (CSC) Scheme grant No. 201908300016, Science Foundation Ireland ADAPT Centre under Grant No. 13/RC/2106 and the Science Foundation Ireland Centre for Research Training in Digitally-Enhanced Reality (D-REAL) under Grant No.18/CRT/6224. 2022-11-16T16:43:10.4780598 2022-06-14T10:17:43.8786777 College of Science Computer Science Yunhan Wu 1 Martin Porcheron 0000-0003-3814-7174 2 Philip Doyle 3 Justin Edwards 4 Daniel Rough 5 Orla Cooney 6 Anna Bleakley 7 Leigh Clark 0000-0002-9237-1057 8 Benjamin Cowan 9 60212__25810__0543edd0344c42d09977c4e80fba57be.pdf 60212.pdf 2022-11-16T16:41:13.0941696 Output 1512259 application/pdf Version of Record true This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution International 4.0 License true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis
spellingShingle Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis
Martin Porcheron
Leigh Clark
title_short Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis
title_full Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis
title_fullStr Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis
title_full_unstemmed Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis
title_sort Comparing Command Construction in Native and Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction through Conversation Analysis
author_id_str_mv d9de398c04c0b443d547d455782d5de5
004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0
author_id_fullname_str_mv d9de398c04c0b443d547d455782d5de5_***_Martin Porcheron
004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0_***_Leigh Clark
author Martin Porcheron
Leigh Clark
author2 Yunhan Wu
Martin Porcheron
Philip Doyle
Justin Edwards
Daniel Rough
Orla Cooney
Anna Bleakley
Leigh Clark
Benjamin Cowan
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container_title 4th Conference on Conversational User Interfaces
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
isbn 978-1-4503-9739-1
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publisher ACM
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description Intelligent Personal Assistants (IPAs) are limited in the languages they support, meaning many people are left to interact using a non-native language. Yet, we know little about how people interact with IPAs in this way. Through a conversation analysis (CA) perspective, we examine native (L1) and non-native (L2) English speaker interactions with Google Assistant, comparing how both user groups produce IPA commands. Our work shows that L1 and L2 speakers similarly used pauses, partial or complete repetition, and hyper-articulation when constructing commands. However, L2 speakers tended to experience issues in lexical access, syntactic construction and pronunciation, resulting in the use of code-mixing, increased pause lengths and off-task rehearsal to help generate commands. We consider reasons for such effects, whilst exploring ways to design IPA interaction to ensure it is sensitive to L2 challenges in command production.
published_date 2022-09-15T16:43:08Z
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