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Symbiont-Mediated RNA Interference (SMR): Using Symbiotic Bacteria as Vectors for Delivering RNAi to Insects.

Paul Dyson Orcid Logo, Miranda Walker, Awawing Anjwengwo Andongma, Marcela Barbosa Figueiredo Santangelo

Methods in molecular biology, Volume: 2360, Pages: 295 - 306

Swansea University Authors: Paul Dyson Orcid Logo, Miranda Walker, Awawing Anjwengwo Andongma, Marcela Barbosa Figueiredo Santangelo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1007/978-1-0716-1633-8_21

Abstract

RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a widely used approach for reverse genetic analysis in eukaryotes. In insects, RNAi also has an application in the control of insect pests. Several methods have been developed for delivery of interfering RNA in insects, with varying outcomes for different speci...

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Published in: Methods in molecular biology
ISBN: 978-1-0716-1632-1 978-1-0716-1633-8
Published: Protocol 2021
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60220
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Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a widely used approach for reverse genetic analysis in eukaryotes. In insects, RNAi also has an application in the control of insect pests. Several methods have been developed for delivery of interfering RNA in insects, with varying outcomes for different species. Here we describe how a bacterial symbiont can be exploited for continuous synthesis of interfering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in its insect host. This approach, termed symbiont-mediated RNAi (SMR), can overcome problems associated with instability of dietary dsRNA due to action of salivary or foregut nucleases. As insects do not possess RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that can amplify and extend RNAi in other organisms, SMR also offers the possibility of long-term systemic RNAi not afforded by single applications of dsRNA to insects by other delivery methods. Here, we describe how SMR can be applied in a globally distributed agricultural pest species, western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis).
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: This work was funded by a Grand Challenges Explorations grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1068514), and a grant from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK (BB/R006418/1).
Start Page: 295
End Page: 306