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Neuropsychological evaluation and rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis (NEuRoMS): protocol for a mixed-methods, multicentre feasibility randomised controlled trial

Gogem Topcu Orcid Logo, Laura Smith Orcid Logo, Jacqueline R. Mhizha-Murira Orcid Logo, Nia Goulden Orcid Logo, Zoë Hoare Orcid Logo, Avril Drummond Orcid Logo, Deborah Fitzsimmons Orcid Logo, Nikos Evangelou Orcid Logo, Klaus Schmierer Orcid Logo, Emma C. Tallantyre Orcid Logo, Paul Leighton Orcid Logo, Kimberley Allen-Philbey Orcid Logo, Andrea Stennett Orcid Logo, Paul Bradley Orcid Logo, Clare Bale, James Turton Orcid Logo, Roshan das Nair Orcid Logo, (On behalf of the NEuRoMS Collective)

Pilot and Feasibility Studies, Volume: 8, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Deborah Fitzsimmons Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundCognitive problems affect up to 70% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), which can negatively impact mood, ability to work, and quality of life. Addressing cognitive problems is a top 10 research priority for people with MS. Our ongoing research has systematically developed a cognitive...

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Published in: Pilot and Feasibility Studies
ISSN: 2055-5784
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60288
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Abstract: BackgroundCognitive problems affect up to 70% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), which can negatively impact mood, ability to work, and quality of life. Addressing cognitive problems is a top 10 research priority for people with MS. Our ongoing research has systematically developed a cognitive screening and management pathway (NEuRoMS) tailored for people with MS, involving a brief cognitive evaluation and rehabilitation intervention. The present study aims to assess the feasibility of delivering the pathway and will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT) to investigate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the intervention and eventually guide its clinical implementation.MethodsThe feasibility study is in three parts. Part 1 involves an observational study of those who receive screening and support for cognitive problems, using routinely collected clinical data. Part 2 is a two-arm, parallel group, multicentre, feasibility RCT with a nested fidelity evaluation. This part will evaluate the feasibility of undertaking a definitive trial comparing the NEuRoMS intervention plus usual care to usual care only, amongst people with MS with mild cognitive problems (n = 60). In part 3, semi-structured interviews will be undertaken with participants from part 2 (n = 25), clinicians (n = 9), and intervention providers (n = 3) involved in delivering the NEuRoMS cognitive screening and management pathway. MS participants will be recruited from outpatient clinics at three UK National Health Service hospitals.DiscussionTimely screening and effective management of cognitive problems in MS are urgently needed due to the detrimental consequences of cognitive problems on people with MS, the healthcare system, and wider society. The NEuRoMS intervention is based on previous and extant literature and has been co-constructed with relevant stakeholders. If effective, the NEuRoMS pathway will facilitate timely identification and management of cognitive problems in people with MS.
Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, Cognition, Cognitive screening, Rehabilitation, Feasibility study, Randomised controlled trial
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: This report is an independent research funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (Programme Grants for Applied Research, neuropsychological evaluation and rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis — developing, evaluating, and implementing a clinical management pathway (NEuRoMS), RP-PG-0218–20002). The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the National institute for Health and Care Research, or the Department of Health and Social Care.
Issue: 1