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Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration

Rory Wilson Orcid Logo, Samantha D. Reynolds, Jonathan R. Potts, James Redcliffe, Mark Holton Orcid Logo, ABIGAIL BUXTON, Kayleigh Rose Orcid Logo, Bradley M. Norman Orcid Logo

iScience, Volume: 25, Issue: 9, Start page: 105008

Swansea University Authors: Rory Wilson Orcid Logo, James Redcliffe, Mark Holton Orcid Logo, ABIGAIL BUXTON, Kayleigh Rose Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Travel represents a major cost for many animals so there should be selection pressure for it to be efficient – at minimum cost. However, animals sometimes exceed minimum travel costs for reasons that must be correspondingly important. We use Dynamic Body Acceleration (DBA), an acceleration-based met...

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Published in: iScience
ISSN: 2589-0042
Published: Elsevier BV 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60524
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spelling 2022-10-07T12:58:09.4212038 v2 60524 2022-07-18 Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc 0000-0003-3177-0177 Rory Wilson Rory Wilson true false 4046e46611e52bf1ee798d17411df8e9 James Redcliffe James Redcliffe true false 0e1d89d0cc934a740dcd0a873aed178e 0000-0001-8834-3283 Mark Holton Mark Holton true false 5e0569814e28fd1a6ce9b872c7a66483 ABIGAIL BUXTON ABIGAIL BUXTON true false 83a47731b96af0d69fcbdb6c4c5a20aa 0000-0001-7023-2809 Kayleigh Rose Kayleigh Rose true false 2022-07-18 SBI Travel represents a major cost for many animals so there should be selection pressure for it to be efficient – at minimum cost. However, animals sometimes exceed minimum travel costs for reasons that must be correspondingly important. We use Dynamic Body Acceleration (DBA), an acceleration-based metric, as a proxy for movement-based power, in tandem with vertical velocity (rate of change in depth) in a shark (Rhincodon typus) to derive the minimum estimated power required to swim at defined vertical velocities. We show how subtraction of measured DBA from the estimated minimum power for any given vertical velocity provides a “proxy for power above minimum” metric (PPAmin), highlighting when these animals travel above minimum power. We suggest that the adoption of this metric across species has value in identifying where and when animals are subject to compelling conditions that lead them to deviate from ostensibly judicious energy expenditure. Journal Article iScience 25 9 105008 Elsevier BV 2589-0042 Biological sciences; biomechanics; biophysics 16 9 2022 2022-09-16 10.1016/j.isci.2022.105008 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University This work was supported through funding provided to BN and SR from the Estate of WV Scott and ECO-CEAN Inc. 2022-10-07T12:58:09.4212038 2022-07-18T15:05:59.1265794 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences Rory Wilson 0000-0003-3177-0177 1 Samantha D. Reynolds 2 Jonathan R. Potts 3 James Redcliffe 4 Mark Holton 0000-0001-8834-3283 5 ABIGAIL BUXTON 6 Kayleigh Rose 0000-0001-7023-2809 7 Bradley M. Norman 0000-0003-0678-1197 8 60524__25354__3bdbfe8007b347378d449c1af2ad5f6d.pdf 60524_VoR.pdf 2022-10-07T12:56:07.1885046 Output 2029371 application/pdf Version of Record true Copyright: 2022 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY license true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration
spellingShingle Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration
Rory Wilson
James Redcliffe
Mark Holton
ABIGAIL BUXTON
Kayleigh Rose
title_short Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration
title_full Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration
title_fullStr Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration
title_full_unstemmed Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration
title_sort Highlighting when animals expend excessive energy for travel using dynamic body acceleration
author_id_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc_***_Rory Wilson
4046e46611e52bf1ee798d17411df8e9_***_James Redcliffe
0e1d89d0cc934a740dcd0a873aed178e_***_Mark Holton
5e0569814e28fd1a6ce9b872c7a66483_***_ABIGAIL BUXTON
83a47731b96af0d69fcbdb6c4c5a20aa_***_Kayleigh Rose
author Rory Wilson
James Redcliffe
Mark Holton
ABIGAIL BUXTON
Kayleigh Rose
author2 Rory Wilson
Samantha D. Reynolds
Jonathan R. Potts
James Redcliffe
Mark Holton
ABIGAIL BUXTON
Kayleigh Rose
Bradley M. Norman
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container_volume 25
container_issue 9
container_start_page 105008
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 2589-0042
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.isci.2022.105008
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences
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description Travel represents a major cost for many animals so there should be selection pressure for it to be efficient – at minimum cost. However, animals sometimes exceed minimum travel costs for reasons that must be correspondingly important. We use Dynamic Body Acceleration (DBA), an acceleration-based metric, as a proxy for movement-based power, in tandem with vertical velocity (rate of change in depth) in a shark (Rhincodon typus) to derive the minimum estimated power required to swim at defined vertical velocities. We show how subtraction of measured DBA from the estimated minimum power for any given vertical velocity provides a “proxy for power above minimum” metric (PPAmin), highlighting when these animals travel above minimum power. We suggest that the adoption of this metric across species has value in identifying where and when animals are subject to compelling conditions that lead them to deviate from ostensibly judicious energy expenditure.
published_date 2022-09-16T04:18:42Z
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