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Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome

Daniel J. Wilson Orcid Logo, Francisco Martin-Martinez Orcid Logo, Leila F. Deravi Orcid Logo

ACS Sensors, Volume: 7, Issue: 2, Pages: 523 - 533

Swansea University Author: Francisco Martin-Martinez Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Overexposure to complete solar radiation (combined ultraviolet, visible, and infrared) is correlated with several harmful biological consequences including hyperpigmentation, skin cancer, eye damage, and immune suppression. With limited effective therapeutic options available for these conditions, s...

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Published in: ACS Sensors
ISSN: 2379-3694 2379-3694
Published: American Chemical Society (ACS) 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60574
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spelling v2 60574 2022-07-21 Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome a5907aac618ec107662c888f6ead0e4a 0000-0001-7149-5512 Francisco Martin-Martinez Francisco Martin-Martinez true false 2022-07-21 CHEM Overexposure to complete solar radiation (combined ultraviolet, visible, and infrared) is correlated with several harmful biological consequences including hyperpigmentation, skin cancer, eye damage, and immune suppression. With limited effective therapeutic options available for these conditions, significant efforts have been directed toward promoting preventative habits. Recently, wearable solar radiometers have emerged as practical tools for managing personal exposure to sunlight. However, designing simple and inexpensive sensors that can measure energy across multiple spectral regions without incorporating electronic components remains challenging, largely due to inherent spectral limitations of photoresponsive indicators. In this work, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of wearable radiation sensors that leverage an unexpected feature of a natural biochrome, xanthommatin―its innate sensitivity to both ultraviolet and visible through near-infrared radiation. We found that xanthommatin-based sensors undergo a visible shift from yellow to red in the presence of complete sunlight. This color change is driven by intrinsic photoreduction of the molecule, which we investigated using computational modeling and supplemented by radiation-driven formation of complementary reducing agents. These sensors are responsive to ermatologically relevant doses of erythemally weighted radiation, as well as cumulative doses of high-energy ultraviolet radiation used for germicidal sterilization. We incorporated these miniature sensors into pressure-activated microfluidic systems to illustrate on-demand activation of a wearable and mountable form factor. When taken together, our findings encompass an important advancement toward accessible, quantitative measurements of UVC and complete solar radiation for a variety of use cases. Journal Article ACS Sensors 7 2 523 533 American Chemical Society (ACS) 2379-3694 2379-3694 bioinspired, sensor, paper-based, wearable, microfluidics, DFT 25 2 2022 2022-02-25 10.1021/acssensors.1c02342 COLLEGE NANME Chemistry COLLEGE CODE CHEM Swansea University 2022-08-18T15:53:02.6355533 2022-07-21T11:19:57.8319708 College of Science Chemistry Daniel J. Wilson 0000-0002-1472-9623 1 Francisco Martin-Martinez 0000-0001-7149-5512 2 Leila F. Deravi 0000-0003-3226-2470 3
title Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome
spellingShingle Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome
Francisco Martin-Martinez
title_short Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome
title_full Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome
title_fullStr Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome
title_full_unstemmed Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome
title_sort Wearable Light Sensors Based on Unique Features of a Natural Biochrome
author_id_str_mv a5907aac618ec107662c888f6ead0e4a
author_id_fullname_str_mv a5907aac618ec107662c888f6ead0e4a_***_Francisco Martin-Martinez
author Francisco Martin-Martinez
author2 Daniel J. Wilson
Francisco Martin-Martinez
Leila F. Deravi
format Journal article
container_title ACS Sensors
container_volume 7
container_issue 2
container_start_page 523
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 2379-3694
2379-3694
doi_str_mv 10.1021/acssensors.1c02342
publisher American Chemical Society (ACS)
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Chemistry{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Chemistry
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description Overexposure to complete solar radiation (combined ultraviolet, visible, and infrared) is correlated with several harmful biological consequences including hyperpigmentation, skin cancer, eye damage, and immune suppression. With limited effective therapeutic options available for these conditions, significant efforts have been directed toward promoting preventative habits. Recently, wearable solar radiometers have emerged as practical tools for managing personal exposure to sunlight. However, designing simple and inexpensive sensors that can measure energy across multiple spectral regions without incorporating electronic components remains challenging, largely due to inherent spectral limitations of photoresponsive indicators. In this work, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of wearable radiation sensors that leverage an unexpected feature of a natural biochrome, xanthommatin―its innate sensitivity to both ultraviolet and visible through near-infrared radiation. We found that xanthommatin-based sensors undergo a visible shift from yellow to red in the presence of complete sunlight. This color change is driven by intrinsic photoreduction of the molecule, which we investigated using computational modeling and supplemented by radiation-driven formation of complementary reducing agents. These sensors are responsive to ermatologically relevant doses of erythemally weighted radiation, as well as cumulative doses of high-energy ultraviolet radiation used for germicidal sterilization. We incorporated these miniature sensors into pressure-activated microfluidic systems to illustrate on-demand activation of a wearable and mountable form factor. When taken together, our findings encompass an important advancement toward accessible, quantitative measurements of UVC and complete solar radiation for a variety of use cases.
published_date 2022-02-25T15:52:58Z
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score 10.897746