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COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy: views and vaccination uptake rates in pregnancy, a mixed methods analysis from the Born In Wales study

Mohamed Mhereeg, Hope Jones, Jonathan Kennedy, Mike Seaborne Orcid Logo, Michael Parker, Tash Kennedy Kennedy, SARAH BEESON, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Luisa Zuccolo, Alisha Davies, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo

Research Square

Swansea University Authors: Mohamed Mhereeg, Hope Jones, Jonathan Kennedy, Mike Seaborne Orcid Logo, Michael Parker, Tash Kennedy Kennedy, SARAH BEESON, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.21203/rs.3.rs-1831644/v1

Abstract

BackgroundVaccine hesitancy amongst pregnant women has been found to be a concern during past epidemics. This study aimed to 1) estimate COVID-19 vaccination rates among pregnant women in Wales and their association with age, ethnicity, and area of deprivation, using electronic health records (EHR)...

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Published in: Research Square
Published: Research Square Platform LLC
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60652
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Abstract: BackgroundVaccine hesitancy amongst pregnant women has been found to be a concern during past epidemics. This study aimed to 1) estimate COVID-19 vaccination rates among pregnant women in Wales and their association with age, ethnicity, and area of deprivation, using electronic health records (EHR) linkage, and 2) explore pregnant women’s views on receiving the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy using data from a survey recruiting via social media (Facebook, Twitter), through midwives, and posters in hospitals (Born in Wales Cohort).MethodsThis was a mixed-methods study utilising routinely collected linked data from the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) (Objective 1) and the Born-In-Wales Birth Cohort participants (Objective 2). Survival analysis was utilised to examine and compare the length of time to vaccination uptake in pregnancy, and variation in uptake by; age, ethnicity, and deprivation area was examined using hazard ratios (HR) from Cox regression. Codebook thematic analysis was used to generate themes from an open-ended question on the survey.ResultsPopulation-level data linkage (objective 1): Within the population cohort, 32.7% (n = 8,203) were vaccinated (at least one dose of the vaccine) during pregnancy, 34.1% (n = 8,572) remained unvaccinated throughout follow-up period, and 33.2% (n = 8,336) received the vaccine postpartum. Younger women (< 30 years) were less likely to have the vaccine and those living in areas of high deprivation were also less likely to have the vaccine (HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.95). Asian and other ethnic groups were 1.12 and 1.18 times more likely to have the vaccine in pregnancy compared to women of White ethnicity (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.25) and (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.37) respectively. Survey responses (objective 2): 69% of participants stated that they would be happy to have the vaccine during pregnancy (n = 207). The remainder, 31%, indicated that they would not have the vaccine during pregnancy (n = 94). Reasons for having the vaccine included protecting self and baby, perceived risk level, and receipt of sufficient evidence and advice. Reasons for vaccine refusal included lack of research about long-term outcomes for the baby, anxiety about vaccines, inconsistent advice/information, and preference to wait until after the pregnancy.ConclusionPotentially only 1 in 3 pregnant women would have the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy, even though 2 in 3 reported they would have the vaccination, thus it is critical to develop tailored strategies to increase its acceptance rate and to decrease vaccine hesitancy. A targeted approach to vaccinations may be required for groups such as younger people and those living in higher deprivation level areas.
Item Description: This is a preprint; it has not been peer reviewed by a journal.
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences