No Cover Image

Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 66 views 4 downloads

Modelling Zombies and Other Diseases

Faron Moller Orcid Logo, Stewart Powell Orcid Logo, Phoebe Asplin, Daniel Archambault Orcid Logo, Cagatay Turkay, Graham McNeill, Max Sondag Sondag

Proceedings of the Sixth APSCE International Conference on Computational Thinking and STEM Education, Pages: 18 - 21

Swansea University Authors: Faron Moller Orcid Logo, Stewart Powell Orcid Logo, Daniel Archambault Orcid Logo, Max Sondag Sondag

  • CTE-STEM22.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

    Download (1.18MB)

DOI (Published version): 10.34641/ctestem.2022.457

Abstract

Computational thinking (CT) has been integrated into K- 12 curricula globally. With the growing trend of initiating CT in early childhood education, great effort has been made in developing age-appropriate courses targeting young children. This study aims to introduce an instructional unit of CT ins...

Full description

Published in: Proceedings of the Sixth APSCE International Conference on Computational Thinking and STEM Education
ISBN: 978-94-6366-563-6
Published: Delft, The Netherlands TU Delft OPEN Publishing 2022
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61011
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Computational thinking (CT) has been integrated into K- 12 curricula globally. With the growing trend of initiating CT in early childhood education, great effort has been made in developing age-appropriate courses targeting young children. This study aims to introduce an instructional unit of CT instruction for children aged 5-7, Coding Galaxy-Foundation, where unplugged activities and digital game-based learning were applied. A public primary school in Hong Kong was invited for delivering the course, where Grade 1 and Grade 3 students were involved (N=57). Six lessons were selected, covering basic CT concepts including sequences, decomposition, events, relative direction, debugging, loops, pattern recognition, and conditionals. Each lesson consisted of three sections, namely, a) concept introduction with daily-life examples, b) unplugged activities based on puzzles, and c) digital game practices with Coding Galaxy game app. Students’ attainment from the course was assessed in both cognitive and attitudinal facets. The results indicated that the course was effective in sustaining students’ CT cognitive performance and improving students’ coding attitudes, and female and Grade 3 cohorts were the most beneficiaries. Implications for further research and educational practices are discussed.
College: College of Science
Start Page: 18
End Page: 21