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Accurate Mass Measurement: Terminology and Treatment of Data

Anthony Brenton Orcid Logo, Ruth Godfrey Orcid Logo

Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry

Swansea University Authors: Anthony Brenton Orcid Logo, Ruth Godfrey Orcid Logo

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Abstract

High-resolution mass spectrometry has become ever more accessible with improvements in instrumentation, such as modern FT-ICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. This has resulted in an increase in the number of articles submitted for publication quoting accurate mass data. There is a plethora of terms...

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Published in: Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
ISSN: 1044-0305
Published: Elsevier (now Springer) 2010
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6116
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Abstract: High-resolution mass spectrometry has become ever more accessible with improvements in instrumentation, such as modern FT-ICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. This has resulted in an increase in the number of articles submitted for publication quoting accurate mass data. There is a plethora of terms related to accurate mass analysis that are in current usage, many employed incorrectly or inconsistently. This article is based on a set of notes prepared by the authors for research students and staff in our laboratories as a guide to the correct terminology and basic statistical procedures to apply in relation to mass measurement, particularly for accurate mass measurement. It elaborates on the editorial by Gross in 1994 regarding the use of accurate masses for structure confirmation [1]. We have presented and defined the main terms in use with reference to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) recommendations for nomenclature and symbolism for mass spectrometry. The correct use of statistics and treatment of data is illustrated as a guide to new and existing mass spectrometry users with a series of examples as well as statistical methods to compare different experimental methods and datasets.
College: Swansea University Medical School