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Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals / R. P Wilson, F Quintana, V. J Hobson, Rory Wilson, Victoria Hobson

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Volume: 279, Pages: 975 - 980

Swansea University Authors: Rory Wilson, Victoria Hobson

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DOI (Published version): 10.1098/rspb.2011.1544

Abstract

<p>Variation in the physical characteristics of the environment should impact the movement energetics of animals. Although cognizance of this may help interpret movement ecology, determination of the landscape-dependent energy expenditure of wild animals is problematic. We used accelerometers...

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Published in: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8452 1471-2954
Published: 2012
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6122
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spelling 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 v2 6122 2011-10-01 Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc 0000-0003-3177-0177 Rory Wilson Rory Wilson true false 9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37 Victoria Hobson Victoria Hobson true false 2011-10-01 SBI <p>Variation in the physical characteristics of the environment should impact the movement energetics of animals. Although cognizance of this may help interpret movement ecology, determination of the landscape-dependent energy expenditure of wild animals is problematic. We used accelerometers in animal-attached tags to derive energy expenditure in 54 free-living imperial cormorants&nbsp;<em>Phalacrocorax atriceps</em>&nbsp;and construct an energy landscape of the area around a breeding colony. Examination of the space use of a further 74 birds over 4 years showed that foraging areas selected varied considerably in distance from the colony and water depth, but were characterized by minimal power requirements compared with other areas in the available landscape. This accords with classic optimal foraging concepts, which state that animals should maximize net energy gain by minimizing costs where possible and show how deriving energy landscapes can help understand how and why animals distribute themselves in space.</p> Journal Article Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 279 975 980 0962-8452 1471-2954 31 12 2012 2012-12-31 10.1098/rspb.2011.1544 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 College of Science Biosciences R. P Wilson 1 F Quintana 2 V. J Hobson 3 Rory Wilson 0000-0003-3177-0177 4 Victoria Hobson 5
title Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals
spellingShingle Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals
Rory, Wilson
Victoria, Hobson
title_short Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals
title_full Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals
title_fullStr Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals
title_full_unstemmed Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals
title_sort Construction of energy landscapes can clarify the movement and distribution of foraging animals
author_id_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc
9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37
author_id_fullname_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc_***_Rory, Wilson
9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37_***_Victoria, Hobson
author Rory, Wilson
Victoria, Hobson
author2 R. P Wilson
F Quintana
V. J Hobson
Rory Wilson
Victoria Hobson
format Journal article
container_title Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
container_volume 279
container_start_page 975
publishDate 2012
institution Swansea University
issn 0962-8452
1471-2954
doi_str_mv 10.1098/rspb.2011.1544
college_str College of Science
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description <p>Variation in the physical characteristics of the environment should impact the movement energetics of animals. Although cognizance of this may help interpret movement ecology, determination of the landscape-dependent energy expenditure of wild animals is problematic. We used accelerometers in animal-attached tags to derive energy expenditure in 54 free-living imperial cormorants&nbsp;<em>Phalacrocorax atriceps</em>&nbsp;and construct an energy landscape of the area around a breeding colony. Examination of the space use of a further 74 birds over 4 years showed that foraging areas selected varied considerably in distance from the colony and water depth, but were characterized by minimal power requirements compared with other areas in the available landscape. This accords with classic optimal foraging concepts, which state that animals should maximize net energy gain by minimizing costs where possible and show how deriving energy landscapes can help understand how and why animals distribute themselves in space.</p>
published_date 2012-12-31T03:18:06Z
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