No Cover Image

Journal article 63 views 2 downloads

Built Environments And Child Health in WalEs and AuStralia (BEACHES): a study protocol

Rebecca Pedrick-Case, Rowena Bailey, Ben Beck Orcid Logo, Bridget Beesley Orcid Logo, Bryan Boruff Orcid Logo, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo, Donna Cross Orcid Logo, Gursimran Dhamrait Orcid Logo, John Duncan Orcid Logo, Peter Gething Orcid Logo, Rhodri Johnson, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Amy Mizen Orcid Logo, Kevin Murray Orcid Logo, Dora Pouliou Orcid Logo, Jim Rafferty Orcid Logo, Trina Robinson Orcid Logo, Michael Rosenberg Orcid Logo, Jasper Schipperijn Orcid Logo, Daniel Thompson, Stewart G Trost Orcid Logo, Alan Watkins Orcid Logo, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Rich Fry Orcid Logo, Hayley Christian Orcid Logo, Lucy Griffiths Orcid Logo

BMJ Open, Volume: 12, Issue: 10, Start page: e061978

Swansea University Authors: Rebecca Pedrick-Case, Rowena Bailey, Sinead Brophy Orcid Logo, Rhodri Johnson, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Amy Mizen Orcid Logo, Dora Pouliou Orcid Logo, Jim Rafferty Orcid Logo, Daniel Thompson, Alan Watkins Orcid Logo, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Rich Fry Orcid Logo, Lucy Griffiths Orcid Logo

  • 61221_VoR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0) license

    Download (1.54MB)

Abstract

Introduction Childhood obesity and physical inactivity are two of the most significant modifiable risk factors for the prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Yet, a third of children in Wales and Australia are overweight or obese, and only 20% of UK and Australian children are sufficiently...

Full description

Published in: BMJ Open
ISSN: 2044-6055 2044-6055
Published: BMJ 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61221
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Introduction Childhood obesity and physical inactivity are two of the most significant modifiable risk factors for the prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Yet, a third of children in Wales and Australia are overweight or obese, and only 20% of UK and Australian children are sufficiently active. The purpose of the Built Environments And Child Health in WalEs and AuStralia (BEACHES) study is to identify and understand how complex and interacting factors in the built environment influence modifiable risk factors for NCDs across childhood.Methods and analysis This is an observational study using data from five established cohorts from Wales and Australia: (1) Wales Electronic Cohort for Children; (2) Millennium Cohort Study; (3) PLAY Spaces and Environments for Children’s Physical Activity study; (4) The ORIGINS Project; and (5) Growing Up in Australia: the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study will incorporate a comprehensive suite of longitudinal quantitative data (surveys, anthropometry, accelerometry, and Geographic Information Systems data) to understand how the built environment influences children’s modifiable risk factors for NCDs (body mass index, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and diet).Ethics and dissemination This study has received the following approvals: University of Western Australia Human Research Ethics Committee (2020/ET000353), Ramsay Human Research Ethics Committee (under review) and Swansea University Information Governance Review Panel (Project ID: 1001). Findings will be reported to the following: (1) funding bodies, research institutes and hospitals supporting the BEACHES project; (2) parents and children; (3) school management teams; (4) existing and new industry partner networks; (5) federal, state and local governments to inform policy; as well as (6) presented at local, national and international conferences; and (7) disseminated by peer-reviewed publications.
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: UK Medical Research Council (MRC) - MR/T039329/1; UKRI-NHMRC Built Environment Prevention Research Scheme - GNT1192764
Issue: 10
Start Page: e061978