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CFD Analysis of the Location of a Rear Wing on an Aston Martin DB7 in Order to Optimize Aerodynamics for Motorsports

THOMAS O'DRISCOLL, Andrew Barron Orcid Logo

Vehicles, Volume: 4, Issue: 2, Pages: 608 - 620

Swansea University Authors: THOMAS O'DRISCOLL, Andrew Barron Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to identify the initial lateral and vertical location and angle of attack of a GT4-style rear wing on the rear downforce for an Aston Martin DB7 Vantage, prior to installation. The tests were completed with a two-dimensional model, using the Computational Fluid Dynamics...

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Published in: Vehicles
ISSN: 2624-8921
Published: MDPI AG 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61226
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Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the initial lateral and vertical location and angle of attack of a GT4-style rear wing on the rear downforce for an Aston Martin DB7 Vantage, prior to installation. The tests were completed with a two-dimensional model, using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent Ansys. The tests were completed using a range of velocities: 60–80 mph. Optimization of the position of the rear wing aerodynamic device was permitted under the Motorsport UK rules for multiple race series. The results show that while the drag decreases the farther back the wing is located, the desired configuration for the rear wing with regard to downforce is when it is positioned ca. 1850 mm back from the center point of the car, with an attack angle of 5°. Unusually, this is to the front of the boot/rear deck, but it is remarkably similar to where Aston Martin set the rear wing on their Le Mans car in 1995, above where the rear windscreen met the boot hinge, which was based upon wind tunnel studies using a scale model. Our results suggest that while 2D simulations of these types cannot give absolute values for downforce due to aerodynamic device location, they can provide low costs, fast simulation time, and a route for a wide range of cars, making the approach accessible to club motorsports, unlike complex 3D simulation and wind tunnel experimentation.
Keywords: aerodynamic; race car; wing; CFD; Aston Martin; lift; drag
College: College of Engineering
Funders: This research received no external funding.
Issue: 2
Start Page: 608
End Page: 620