No Cover Image

Journal article 501 views 109 downloads

Comparison of dense optical flow and PIV techniques for mapping surface current flow in tidal stream energy sites

J. McIlvenny Orcid Logo, B. J. Williamson Orcid Logo, Iain Fairley, M. Lewis Orcid Logo, S. Neill Orcid Logo, Ian Masters Orcid Logo, Dominic Reeve Orcid Logo

International Journal of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Volume: 14

Swansea University Authors: Iain Fairley, Ian Masters Orcid Logo, Dominic Reeve Orcid Logo

  • 61250_VoR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

    Download (4.95MB)

Abstract

Marine renewable energy site and resource characterisation, in particular tidal stream energy, require detailed flow measurements which often rely on high-cost in situ instrumentation which is limited in spatial extent. We hypothesise uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAV) offer a low-cost and low-risk data...

Full description

Published in: International Journal of Energy and Environmental Engineering
ISSN: 2008-9163 2251-6832
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61250
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Marine renewable energy site and resource characterisation, in particular tidal stream energy, require detailed flow measurements which often rely on high-cost in situ instrumentation which is limited in spatial extent. We hypothesise uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAV) offer a low-cost and low-risk data collection method for tidal stream environments, as recently techniques have been developed to derive flow from optical videography. This may benefit tidal and floating renewable energy developments, providing additional insight into flow conditions and complement traditional instrumentation. Benefits to existing data collection methods include capturing flow over a large spatial extent synchronously, which could be used to analyse flow around structures or for site characterisation; however, uncertainty and method application to tidal energy sites is unclear. Here, two algorithms are tested: large-scale particle image velocimetry using PIVlab and dense optical flow. The methods are applied on video data collected at two tidal stream energy sites (Pentland Firth, Scotland, and Ramsey Sound, Wales) for a range of flow and environmental conditions. Although average validation measures were similar (~ 20–30% error), we recommend PIVlab processed velocity data at tidal energy sites because we find bias (underprediction) in optical flow for higher velocities (> 1 m/s).
Keywords: Tidal stream; Remote sensing; Energy; Drones; UAV; Optical flow
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, EP/S000747/1, Benjamin J. Williamson