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High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish / G. C Hays, T Bastian, T. K Doyle, S Fossette, A. C Gleiss, M. B Gravenor, V. J Hobson, N. E Humphries, M. K. S Lilley, N. G Pade, D. W Sims, Michael Gravenor, Victoria Hobson

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Swansea University Authors: Michael Gravenor, Victoria Hobson

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DOI (Published version): 10.1098/rspb.2011.0978

Abstract

Over-fishing may lead to a decrease in fish abundance and a proliferation of jellyfish. Active movements and prey search might be thought to provide a competitive advantage for fish, but here we use data-loggers to show that the frequently occurring coastal jellyfish (Rhizostoma octopus) does not si...

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Published in: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8452 1471-2954
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6132
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spelling 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 v2 6132 2011-10-01 High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish 70a544476ce62ba78502ce463c2500d6 0000-0003-0710-0947 Michael Gravenor Michael Gravenor true false 9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37 Victoria Hobson Victoria Hobson true false 2011-10-01 HDAT Over-fishing may lead to a decrease in fish abundance and a proliferation of jellyfish. Active movements and prey search might be thought to provide a competitive advantage for fish, but here we use data-loggers to show that the frequently occurring coastal jellyfish (Rhizostoma octopus) does not simply passively drift to encounter prey. Jellyfish (327 days of data from 25 jellyfish with depth collected every 1 min) showed very dynamic vertical movements, with their integrated vertical movement averaging 619.2 m up, more than 60 times the water depth where they were tagged. The majority of movement patterns were best approximated by exponential models describing normal random walks. However, jellyfish also showed switching behaviour from exponential patterns to patterns best fitted by a truncated L&eacute;vy distribution with exponents (mean= 1.96, range 1.2-2.9) close to the theoretical optimum for searching for sparse prey (mu= 2.0). Complex movements in these simple animals may help jellyfish to compete effectively with fish for plankton prey, which may enhance their ability to increase in dominance in perturbed ocean systems. Journal Article Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 0962-8452 1471-2954 31 12 2011 2011-12-31 10.1098/rspb.2011.0978 COLLEGE NANME Health Data Science COLLEGE CODE HDAT Swansea University 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 College of Science Biosciences G. C Hays 1 T Bastian 2 T. K Doyle 3 S Fossette 4 A. C Gleiss 5 M. B Gravenor 6 V. J Hobson 7 N. E Humphries 8 M. K. S Lilley 9 N. G Pade 10 D. W Sims 11 Michael Gravenor 0000-0003-0710-0947 12 Victoria Hobson 13
title High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish
spellingShingle High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish
Michael, Gravenor
Victoria, Hobson
title_short High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish
title_full High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish
title_fullStr High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish
title_full_unstemmed High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish
title_sort High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish
author_id_str_mv 70a544476ce62ba78502ce463c2500d6
9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37
author_id_fullname_str_mv 70a544476ce62ba78502ce463c2500d6_***_Michael, Gravenor
9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37_***_Victoria, Hobson
author Michael, Gravenor
Victoria, Hobson
author2 G. C Hays
T Bastian
T. K Doyle
S Fossette
A. C Gleiss
M. B Gravenor
V. J Hobson
N. E Humphries
M. K. S Lilley
N. G Pade
D. W Sims
Michael Gravenor
Victoria Hobson
format Journal article
container_title Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
issn 0962-8452
1471-2954
doi_str_mv 10.1098/rspb.2011.0978
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Over-fishing may lead to a decrease in fish abundance and a proliferation of jellyfish. Active movements and prey search might be thought to provide a competitive advantage for fish, but here we use data-loggers to show that the frequently occurring coastal jellyfish (Rhizostoma octopus) does not simply passively drift to encounter prey. Jellyfish (327 days of data from 25 jellyfish with depth collected every 1 min) showed very dynamic vertical movements, with their integrated vertical movement averaging 619.2 m up, more than 60 times the water depth where they were tagged. The majority of movement patterns were best approximated by exponential models describing normal random walks. However, jellyfish also showed switching behaviour from exponential patterns to patterns best fitted by a truncated L&eacute;vy distribution with exponents (mean= 1.96, range 1.2-2.9) close to the theoretical optimum for searching for sparse prey (mu= 2.0). Complex movements in these simple animals may help jellyfish to compete effectively with fish for plankton prey, which may enhance their ability to increase in dominance in perturbed ocean systems.
published_date 2011-12-31T03:17:41Z
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