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Understanding drivers' trust after software malfunctions and cyber intrusions of digital displays in an automated car

William Payre, Jaume Perellomarch, Giedre Sabaliauskaite Orcid Logo, Hesamaldin Jadidbonab, Siraj Shaikh Orcid Logo, Hoang Nguyen Orcid Logo, Stewart Birrell

Human Factors in Transportation, Volume: 60, Pages: 320 - 328

Swansea University Authors: Giedre Sabaliauskaite Orcid Logo, Siraj Shaikh Orcid Logo, Hoang Nguyen Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.54941/ahfe1002463

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to examine the effect of explicit (i.e., ransomware) and silent (i.e., no turn signals) automation failures on drivers’ reported levels of trust and perception of risk. In a driving simulator study, 38 participants rode in a conditionally automated vehicle in built-up areas...

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Published in: Human Factors in Transportation
ISSN: 2771-0718
Published: AHFE International 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61832
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Abstract: The aim of this paper is to examine the effect of explicit (i.e., ransomware) and silent (i.e., no turn signals) automation failures on drivers’ reported levels of trust and perception of risk. In a driving simulator study, 38 participants rode in a conditionally automated vehicle in built-up areas and motorways. They all experienced both failures. Not only levels of trust decreased after experiencing the failures, especially after the explicit one, but also some of the scores were low. This could mean cyber-attacks lead to distrust in automated driving, rather than merely decreasing levels of trust. Participants also seemed to differentiate connected driving from automated driving in terms of perception of risk. These results are discussed in the context of cyber intrusions as well as long- and short-term trust.
Keywords: Trust, Automation, Automotive, Cyber security, Driving, Digital display, Perception of risk
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: This work was supported by the UKRI Trustworthy Autonomous Systems Hub (EP/V00784X/1).
Start Page: 320
End Page: 328