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Change in depression predicts change in bladder symptoms for women with urinary incontinence undergoing pelvic-floor muscle training

Lisa Osborne, C. Mair Whittall, Simon Emery, Phil Reed Orcid Logo

European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Volume: 280, Pages: 54 - 59

Swansea University Authors: Lisa Osborne, Simon Emery, Phil Reed Orcid Logo

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Abstract

IntroductionTo examine the relationship between depression and bladder symptoms, especially the impact of change in depression on changes in bladder symptoms, for women with urge and stress urinary incontinence undergoing a course of PFMT.Method106 adult females with pelvic-floor dysfunction (PFD),...

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Published in: European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
ISSN: 0301-2115
Published: Elsevier BV 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61896
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Abstract: IntroductionTo examine the relationship between depression and bladder symptoms, especially the impact of change in depression on changes in bladder symptoms, for women with urge and stress urinary incontinence undergoing a course of PFMT.Method106 adult females with pelvic-floor dysfunction (PFD), consecutively referred to an outpatient pelvic-floor muscle training (PFMT) programme for either urge, stress, or mixed incontinence, participated in a prospective observational study. Participants reported subjective views of their pelvic floor problems (Queensland), and their levels of depression (HADS_D), and data relating to age and BMI were collected. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02549157).ResultsThere was a positive relationship between depression and bladder symptoms at intake. Levels of initial depression significantly predicted levels of bladder symptoms at completion of PFMT, and ability to complete the PFMT programme. Change in depression significantly predicted change in bladder symptoms, over and above intake patient characteristics and symptoms.DiscussionThese data imply a multidisciplinary focus, including psychological input, for PFD may be a highly effective strategy for its management.
Keywords: Depression; Urge urinary incontinence; Stress urinary incontinence; Pelvic-floor muscle training; Pelvic-floor dysfunction; Women
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Start Page: 54
End Page: 59