No Cover Image

Journal article 166 views 58 downloads

Scarcity in COVID‐19 vaccine supplies reduces perceived vaccination priority and increases vaccine hesitancy

Beatriz Pereira Orcid Logo, Amy Greiner Fehl Orcid Logo, Stacey R. Finkelstein, Gabriela Jiga-Boy Orcid Logo, Marta Caserotti Orcid Logo

Psychology and Marketing, Volume: 39, Issue: 5, Pages: 921 - 936

Swansea University Author: Gabriela Jiga-Boy Orcid Logo

  • 62127.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © 2021 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License

    Download (1.15MB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1002/mar.21629

Abstract

In two experimental studies, we tested the effect of COVID-19 vaccine scarcity on vaccine hesitancy. Based on extensive scarcity literature, we initially predicted that high (vs. low) scarcity would increase demand for vaccines, operationalized as one's willingness to receive a vaccine. Contrar...

Full description

Published in: Psychology and Marketing
ISSN: 0742-6046 1520-6793
Published: Wiley 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa62127
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: In two experimental studies, we tested the effect of COVID-19 vaccine scarcity on vaccine hesitancy. Based on extensive scarcity literature, we initially predicted that high (vs. low) scarcity would increase demand for vaccines, operationalized as one's willingness to receive a vaccine. Contrary to this prediction, Study 1 showed that scarcity of vaccines reduced participants’ sense of priority which, in turn, also reduced their vaccination intentions. Trust in doctors moderated the effect of perceived vaccination priority on vaccination intentions such that for individuals with high trust in doctors, reduced perceived priority did not reduce their vaccination intentions as much. Study 2 replicated these effects with a more general population sample, which included at-risk individuals for COVID-19 complications. At-risk participants (vs. low-risk) had higher perceived vaccination priority, but describing vaccine doses as scarce reduced vaccination intentions similarly across both groups. Moreover, Study 2 demonstrated that compassion for others is a boundary condition of the effect of vaccine scarcity on vaccination intentions. For participants with high compassion, scarcity reduces willingness to receive a vaccine; for participants with low compassion, scarcity increases their willingness to be vaccinated. Our results suggest that health policymakers need to deemphasize the scarcity of vaccines to increase vaccine acceptance.
Keywords: at‐risk populations, compassion, COVID‐19, scarcity, trust, vaccine hesitancy, vaccinationintentions
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Issue: 5
Start Page: 921
End Page: 936