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The Economic Potential of Smoking Cessation Interventions at the Point of Diagnosis of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Mari Jones Orcid Logo, Julia Lowin, Berni Sewell Orcid Logo, Rachel Gemine, Sarah Rees Orcid Logo, Kirsty Lanyon Orcid Logo, Keir Lewis Orcid Logo

Value in Health, Volume: 26, Issue: 8, Pages: 1192 - 1200

Swansea University Authors: Mari Jones Orcid Logo, Julia Lowin, Berni Sewell Orcid Logo, Rachel Gemine, Sarah Rees Orcid Logo, Kirsty Lanyon Orcid Logo, Keir Lewis Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Stopping smoking has proven benefits in nearly all illnesses but the impact and health economic benefits of stopping smoking following a diagnosis of lung cancer are less well defined. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation (SC) services for newly diagnosed lung cancer patients agai...

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Published in: Value in Health
ISSN: 1098-3015
Published: Elsevier BV 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa63282
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Abstract: Stopping smoking has proven benefits in nearly all illnesses but the impact and health economic benefits of stopping smoking following a diagnosis of lung cancer are less well defined. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation (SC) services for newly diagnosed lung cancer patients against current usual care, where patients are unlikely to receive SC service referral. A health economic model was constructed in Excel. The modelled population comprised patients with a new diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data from the LungCast dataset (Clinical Trials Identifier NCT01192256) were used to estimate model inputs. A structured search of published literature identified inputs not represented in LungCast, including healthcare resource use and costs. Costs were estimated from a 2020/21 UK NHS and Personal Social Services (PSS) perspective. The model estimated the incremental quality-adjusted adjusted life year (QALY) gained in newly diagnosed NSCLC patients receiving targeted SC intervention compared to those receiving no intervention. Extensive one-way sensitivity analyses (SA) explored input and dataset uncertainty.Results: In the five-year base-case, the model estimated an incremental cost of £14,904 per QALY gained through SC intervention. Sensitivity analysis estimated an outcome range of between £9,935 and £32,246 per QALY gained. The model was most sensitive to the estimates of relative quit rates and expected healthcare resource use.
Keywords: cost, economic model, non–small cell lung cancer, quality-adjusted life-year, smoking cessation
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Issue: 8
Start Page: 1192
End Page: 1200