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Lower-limb wearable resistance overloads joint angular velocity during early acceleration sprint running

Erin H Feser, Jonathon Neville, Denny Wells, Shelley Diewald, Mai Kameda, Neil Bezodis Orcid Logo, Kenneth Clark, Ryu Nagahara, Paul Macadam, Aaron M. Uthoff, Farhan Tinwala, John B. Cronin

Journal of Sports Sciences, Volume: 41, Issue: 4, Pages: 326 - 332

Swansea University Author: Neil Bezodis Orcid Logo

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 14th May 2024

Abstract

Lower-limb wearable resistance (WR) facilitates targeted resistance-based training during sports-specific movement tasks. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two different WR placements (thigh and shank) on joint kinematics during the acceleration phase of sprint running. Eighte...

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Published in: Journal of Sports Sciences
ISSN: 0264-0414 1466-447X
Published: Informa UK Limited 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa63378
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Abstract: Lower-limb wearable resistance (WR) facilitates targeted resistance-based training during sports-specific movement tasks. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two different WR placements (thigh and shank) on joint kinematics during the acceleration phase of sprint running. Eighteen participants completed maximal effort sprints while unloaded and with 2% body mass thigh- or shank-placed WR. The main findings were: 1) the increase to 10 m sprint time was small with thigh WR (effect size [ES] = 0.24), and with shank WR the increase was also small but significant (ES = 0.33); 2) significant differences in peak joint angles between the unloaded and WR conditions were small (ES = 0.23–0.38), limited to the hip and knee joints, and < 2° on average; 3) aside from peak hip flexion angles, no clear trends were observed in individual difference scores; and, 4) thigh and shank WR produced similar reductions in average hip flexion and extension angular velocities. The significant overload to hip flexion and extension velocity with both thigh- and shank-placed WR may be beneficial to target the flexion and extension actions associated with fast sprint running.
Keywords: Specificity, motion analysis, limb loadings, printing
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Issue: 4
Start Page: 326
End Page: 332