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Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19

Charlotte Jones Orcid Logo, Lauren White Orcid Logo, Jen Slater Orcid Logo, Jill Pluquailec Orcid Logo

Sociology

Swansea University Author: Charlotte Jones Orcid Logo

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Abstract

This article focuses on how the imaginary of a ‘safe’ environment was visualised and conveyed within the hospitality sector during the COVID-19 pandemic, drawing on diaries and interviews with 21 workers in the UK. Our findings show increased workloads for hospitality staff, compounded by anxieties...

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Published in: Sociology
ISSN: 0038-0385 1469-8684
Published: SAGE Publications
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa63843
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first_indexed 2023-07-12T14:29:14Z
last_indexed 2023-07-12T14:29:14Z
id cronfa63843
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spelling v2 63843 2023-07-10 Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19 60ff57269cfe0e65e571b0a68a82f69f 0000-0002-7348-4662 Charlotte Jones Charlotte Jones true false 2023-07-10 CSSP This article focuses on how the imaginary of a ‘safe’ environment was visualised and conveyed within the hospitality sector during the COVID-19 pandemic, drawing on diaries and interviews with 21 workers in the UK. Our findings show increased workloads for hospitality staff, compounded by anxieties of risk and individualised COVID-19 regulation work. This includes workers’ negotiations of corporeal boundaries and distancing from customers, the visible cleaning of communal areas and recuperation and care work for their own bodies and others in shared living spaces. We draw on conceptualisations of embodied and emotional labour to understand these experiences, reflecting on the importance of the actions performed by workers in maintaining community spaces and creating customer confidence in safely enjoying a ‘hospitable’ environment. This article contributes to social science scholarship of embodied and emotional labour, hospitality and social reproduction. Journal Article Sociology SAGE Publications 0038-0385 1469-8684 Body work, cleaning, COVID, emotional labour, employment, hospitality, hygiene, pandemic, social reproduction, work 0 0 0 0001-01-01 10.1177/00380385231189190 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00380385231189190 COLLEGE NANME Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy COLLEGE CODE CSSP Swansea University SU College/Department paid the OA fee Wellcome Trust 2023-10-26T10:04:06.1954351 2023-07-10T09:08:00.5581982 Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences School of Social Sciences - Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy Charlotte Jones 0000-0002-7348-4662 1 Lauren White 0000-0002-6704-4054 2 Jen Slater 0000-0001-6739-7784 3 Jill Pluquailec 0000-0002-7631-3607 4 63843__28875__5acd1214cab14b5b9f189c313b0dd719.pdf 63843.VOR.pdf 2023-10-26T10:00:24.9949340 Output 269778 application/pdf Version of Record true © The Author(s) 2023. Distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (CC BY 4.0). true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19
spellingShingle Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19
Charlotte Jones
title_short Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19
title_full Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19
title_fullStr Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19
title_full_unstemmed Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19
title_sort Hospitality Work as Social Reproduction: Embodied and Emotional Labour during COVID-19
author_id_str_mv 60ff57269cfe0e65e571b0a68a82f69f
author_id_fullname_str_mv 60ff57269cfe0e65e571b0a68a82f69f_***_Charlotte Jones
author Charlotte Jones
author2 Charlotte Jones
Lauren White
Jen Slater
Jill Pluquailec
format Journal article
container_title Sociology
institution Swansea University
issn 0038-0385
1469-8684
doi_str_mv 10.1177/00380385231189190
publisher SAGE Publications
college_str Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofhumanitiesandsocialsciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofhumanitiesandsocialsciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
department_str School of Social Sciences - Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Social Sciences - Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00380385231189190
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description This article focuses on how the imaginary of a ‘safe’ environment was visualised and conveyed within the hospitality sector during the COVID-19 pandemic, drawing on diaries and interviews with 21 workers in the UK. Our findings show increased workloads for hospitality staff, compounded by anxieties of risk and individualised COVID-19 regulation work. This includes workers’ negotiations of corporeal boundaries and distancing from customers, the visible cleaning of communal areas and recuperation and care work for their own bodies and others in shared living spaces. We draw on conceptualisations of embodied and emotional labour to understand these experiences, reflecting on the importance of the actions performed by workers in maintaining community spaces and creating customer confidence in safely enjoying a ‘hospitable’ environment. This article contributes to social science scholarship of embodied and emotional labour, hospitality and social reproduction.
published_date 0001-01-01T10:04:05Z
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