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The effects of age bias on neural correlates of successful and unsuccessful response inhibition in younger and older adults

Claire Hanley Orcid Logo, Natasha Burns, Hannah R. Thomas, Lars Marstaller, Hana Burianova

Neurobiology of Aging, Volume: 131, Pages: 1 - 10

Swansea University Authors: Claire Hanley Orcid Logo, Hana Burianova

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Abstract

Facilitating communication between generations has become increasingly important. However, individuals often demonstrate a preference for their own age-group, which can impact social interactions, and such bias in young adults even extends to inhibitory control. To assesses whether older adults also...

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Published in: Neurobiology of Aging
ISSN: 0197-4580
Published: Elsevier BV 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa63865
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Abstract: Facilitating communication between generations has become increasingly important. However, individuals often demonstrate a preference for their own age-group, which can impact social interactions, and such bias in young adults even extends to inhibitory control. To assesses whether older adults also experience this phenomenon, a group of younger and older adults completed a Go/NoGo task incorporating young and old faces, while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Within the networks subserving successful and unsuccessful response inhibition, patterns of activity demonstrated distinct neural age bias effects in each age group. During successful inhibition, the older adult group demonstrated significantly increased activity to other-age faces, whereas unsuccessful inhibition in the younger group produced significantly enhanced activity to other-age faces. Consequently, the findings of the study confirm that neural responses to successful and unsuccessful inhibition can be contingent on the stimulus-specific attribute of age, in both younger and older adults. These findings have important implications in regard to minimising the emergence of negative consequences, such as ageism, as a result of related implicit biases.
Keywords: Ageing, Age bias, fMRI, Go/NoGo, Response inhibition, Social cognition
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: Swansea University
Start Page: 1
End Page: 10