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How did online misinformation impact stockouts in the e-commerce supply chain during COVID-19 – A mixed methods study

Shagun Sarraf, Amit Kumar Kushwaha Orcid Logo, Arpan Kumar Kar Orcid Logo, Yogesh Dwivedi Orcid Logo, Mihalis Giannakis Orcid Logo

International Journal of Production Economics, Volume: 267, Start page: 109064

Swansea University Author: Yogesh Dwivedi Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The proliferation of fake news across the internet has become a significant area of concern globally. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights that the propagation of fake news can jeopardize public health and heighten irrational behavior amongst consumers, like panic buying. However, the existing literatur...

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Published in: International Journal of Production Economics
ISSN: 0925-5273
Published: Elsevier BV 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa64759
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Abstract: The proliferation of fake news across the internet has become a significant area of concern globally. The COVID-19 pandemic highlights that the propagation of fake news can jeopardize public health and heighten irrational behavior amongst consumers, like panic buying. However, the existing literature has not explored its impact on the supply chain. This study uses reactance and cognitive load theories to examine a model for fake news propagation causing supply chain disruption. Our research employed a computationally intensive big data-driven method across three studies to demonstrate misinformation's impact on supply chain disruption, identify the factors creating this impact, and validate an inferential analysis model to explain this phenomenon. Results highlight the relationship between unverified information sharing (UIS) and perceived threat, perceived scarcity, fear appeal, and information overload with panic buying. The paper dwells more profoundly on fake news disrupting the supply chain.
Keywords: Misinformation, Supply chain disruption, Social media analytics, Electronic commerce, Buying behavior
College: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Start Page: 109064