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Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society

Katherine Cullen Orcid Logo, Mari Jones Orcid Logo, Christina Sheehan Orcid Logo, Frances Game, Kavita Vedhara, Deborah Fitzsimmons Orcid Logo

Journal of Research in Nursing, Volume: 28, Issue: 8, Pages: 565 - 578

Swansea University Authors: Katherine Cullen Orcid Logo, Mari Jones Orcid Logo, Deborah Fitzsimmons Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundDiabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) add a significant burden to the lives of people with diabetes in the United Kingdom. They can have a considerable impact on a patient’s daily life, with treatment requiring frequent changes of dressings and clinic attendances. Nurses and other allied health prof...

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Published in: Journal of Research in Nursing
ISSN: 1744-9871 1744-988X
Published: SAGE Publications 2023
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa64907
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They can have a considerable impact on a patient’s daily life, with treatment requiring frequent changes of dressings and clinic attendances. Nurses and other allied health professionals (AHPs) within the community provide most wound care representing the primary cost driver. AimsTo collaboratively explore key resource use related to the management of DFUs to develop, and pilot, a participant-reported measure to inform economic evaluations.MethodsA literature search and semi-structured interviews determined health and non-health resource use in management of DFUs. A consensus view of the selected items was established in a modified Delphi study and further tested for acceptability and validity in a pilot study. ResultsPrimary care consultations with a podiatrist or orthotist, district nurse visits, out-of-hours and emergency care, scans and investigations, and consumables provided in clinics, were rated as the most important resource use items. 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spelling v2 64907 2023-11-02 Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society 9ddf9fac6330356b51fbb9f38fd6081f 0000-0002-3704-4598 Katherine Cullen Katherine Cullen true false 8e326860810f5f960b088db10ef58906 0000-0001-9661-4899 Mari Jones Mari Jones true false e900d99a0977beccf607233b10c66b43 0000-0002-7286-8410 Deborah Fitzsimmons Deborah Fitzsimmons true false 2023-11-02 PHAC BackgroundDiabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) add a significant burden to the lives of people with diabetes in the United Kingdom. They can have a considerable impact on a patient’s daily life, with treatment requiring frequent changes of dressings and clinic attendances. Nurses and other allied health professionals (AHPs) within the community provide most wound care representing the primary cost driver. AimsTo collaboratively explore key resource use related to the management of DFUs to develop, and pilot, a participant-reported measure to inform economic evaluations.MethodsA literature search and semi-structured interviews determined health and non-health resource use in management of DFUs. A consensus view of the selected items was established in a modified Delphi study and further tested for acceptability and validity in a pilot study. ResultsPrimary care consultations with a podiatrist or orthotist, district nurse visits, out-of-hours and emergency care, scans and investigations, and consumables provided in clinics, were rated as the most important resource use items. ConclusionsThis work has informed the development of a measure that captures resource use considered important by the people most affected by DFUs; patients, family members and carers, and the healthcare professionals key to DFU management. Journal Article Journal of Research in Nursing 28 8 565 578 SAGE Publications 1744-9871 1744-988X diabetes, instrument development, public and patient involvement, survey, statistical analysis, methods,adults 27 12 2023 2023-12-27 10.1177/17449871231208108 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University Other NIHR Programme Grant for Applied Research (RP-PG-0618-20001) RP-PG-0618-20001 2024-04-16T12:55:38.5487772 2023-11-02T14:55:09.5926560 College of Human and Health Sciences Swansea Centre for Health Economics Katherine Cullen 0000-0002-3704-4598 1 Mari Jones 0000-0001-9661-4899 2 Christina Sheehan 0000-0002-2967-0425 3 Frances Game 4 Kavita Vedhara 5 Deborah Fitzsimmons 0000-0002-7286-8410 6 64907__29347__297853c7e7914f1693e3dad3017aa668.pdf 64907.pdf 2024-01-03T10:41:03.0396702 Output 490673 application/pdf Version of Record true This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society
spellingShingle Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society
Katherine Cullen
Mari Jones
Deborah Fitzsimmons
title_short Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society
title_full Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society
title_fullStr Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society
title_full_unstemmed Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society
title_sort Development of a resource-use measure to capture costs of diabetic foot ulcers to the United Kingdom National Health Service, patients and society
author_id_str_mv 9ddf9fac6330356b51fbb9f38fd6081f
8e326860810f5f960b088db10ef58906
e900d99a0977beccf607233b10c66b43
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9ddf9fac6330356b51fbb9f38fd6081f_***_Katherine Cullen
8e326860810f5f960b088db10ef58906_***_Mari Jones
e900d99a0977beccf607233b10c66b43_***_Deborah Fitzsimmons
author Katherine Cullen
Mari Jones
Deborah Fitzsimmons
author2 Katherine Cullen
Mari Jones
Christina Sheehan
Frances Game
Kavita Vedhara
Deborah Fitzsimmons
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Research in Nursing
container_volume 28
container_issue 8
container_start_page 565
publishDate 2023
institution Swansea University
issn 1744-9871
1744-988X
doi_str_mv 10.1177/17449871231208108
publisher SAGE Publications
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Swansea Centre for Health Economics{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Swansea Centre for Health Economics
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description BackgroundDiabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) add a significant burden to the lives of people with diabetes in the United Kingdom. They can have a considerable impact on a patient’s daily life, with treatment requiring frequent changes of dressings and clinic attendances. Nurses and other allied health professionals (AHPs) within the community provide most wound care representing the primary cost driver. AimsTo collaboratively explore key resource use related to the management of DFUs to develop, and pilot, a participant-reported measure to inform economic evaluations.MethodsA literature search and semi-structured interviews determined health and non-health resource use in management of DFUs. A consensus view of the selected items was established in a modified Delphi study and further tested for acceptability and validity in a pilot study. ResultsPrimary care consultations with a podiatrist or orthotist, district nurse visits, out-of-hours and emergency care, scans and investigations, and consumables provided in clinics, were rated as the most important resource use items. ConclusionsThis work has informed the development of a measure that captures resource use considered important by the people most affected by DFUs; patients, family members and carers, and the healthcare professionals key to DFU management.
published_date 2023-12-27T12:55:35Z
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