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The association of anxiety disorders and depression with facial scarring: population-based, data linkage, matched cohort analysis of 358 158 patients

John A. G. Gibson Orcid Logo, Thomas Dobbs, Rowena Griffiths, Jiao Song Orcid Logo, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Owen Bodger Orcid Logo, Hayley Hutchings Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Ann John Orcid Logo, Iain Whitaker

BJPsych Open, Volume: 9, Issue: 6

Swansea University Authors: Thomas Dobbs, Rowena Griffiths, Jiao Song Orcid Logo, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Owen Bodger Orcid Logo, Hayley Hutchings Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Ann John Orcid Logo, Iain Whitaker

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DOI (Published version): 10.1192/bjo.2023.547

Abstract

Background: Estimates suggest that 1 in 100 people in the UK live with facial scarring. Despite this incidence, psychological support is limited. Aims: The aim of this study was to strengthen the case for improving such support by determining the incidence and risk factors for anxiety and depression...

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Published in: BJPsych Open
ISSN: 2056-4724
Published: Royal College of Psychiatrists 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa64997
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Abstract: Background: Estimates suggest that 1 in 100 people in the UK live with facial scarring. Despite this incidence, psychological support is limited. Aims: The aim of this study was to strengthen the case for improving such support by determining the incidence and risk factors for anxiety and depression disorders in patients with facial scarring. Method: A matched cohort study was performed. Patients were identified via secondary care data sources, using clinical codes for conditions resulting in facial scarring. A diagnosis of anxiety or depression was determined by linkage with the patient's primary care general practice data. Incidence was calculated per 1000 person-years at risk (PYAR). Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors. Results: Between 2009 and 2018, 179 079 patients met the study criteria and were identified as having a facial scar, and matched to 179 079 controls. The incidence of anxiety in the facial scarring group was 10.05 per 1000 PYAR compared with 7.48 per 1000 PYAR for controls. The incidence of depression in the facial scarring group was 16.28 per 1000 PYAR compared with 9.56 per 1000 PYAR for controls. Age at the time of scarring, previous history of anxiety or depression, female gender, socioeconomic status and classification of scarring increased the risk of both anxiety disorders and depression. Conclusions: There is a high burden of anxiety disorders and depression in this patient group. Risk of these mental health disorders is very much determined by factors apparent at the time of injury, supporting the need for psychological support.
Keywords: Anxiety or fear-related disorders, depressive disorders, epidemiology, risk assessment, trauma and stressor-related disorders
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: This research was funded via the AFFECT project, which is part of the Scar Free Foundation Programme of Regenerative Research at the Reconstructive Surgery & Regenerative Medicine Research Centre (ReconRegen), in partnership with Health & Care Research Wales. A.J. was funded through the Medical Research Council (DATAMIND, grant number MR/W014386/1). This work was supported by Health Data Research UK (grant number HDR-9006), which receives its funding from the UK Medical Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, Department of Health and Social Care (England), Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates, Health and Social Care Research and Development Division (Welsh Government), Public Health Agency (Northern Ireland), British Heart Foundation and the Wellcome Trust; and Administrative Data Research UK, which is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (grant number ES/S007393/1).
Issue: 6