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Towards a common terminology in radioglaciology

Rebecca Schlegel, Bernd Kulessa Orcid Logo, Tavi Murray Orcid Logo, Olaf Eisen Orcid Logo

Annals of Glaciology, Volume: 63, Issue: 87-89, Pages: 8 - 12

Swansea University Authors: Bernd Kulessa Orcid Logo, Tavi Murray Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1017/aog.2023.2

Abstract

Over the past 70 years, many different components of the cryosphere have been imaged with a variety of radar systems using increasingly sophisticated processing techniques. These systems use various pulse lengths, signal frequencies and, in some cases, modulated signals. The increasing diversity of...

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Published in: Annals of Glaciology
ISSN: 0260-3055 1727-5644
Published: Cambridge University Press (CUP) 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65065
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Abstract: Over the past 70 years, many different components of the cryosphere have been imaged with a variety of radar systems using increasingly sophisticated processing techniques. These systems use various pulse lengths, signal frequencies and, in some cases, modulated signals. The increasing diversity of radar systems has created the potential for confusion due to the use of non-consistent terminology. Here we provide an overview of state-of-the-science radar technologies and suggest a simplified and unified terminology for use by the cryosphere community. We recommend a terminology that is target independent but specifies the characteristics of the signal. Following this recommendation, commercial impulse systems that penetrate the subsurface should be referred to as ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and pulse radars as radio-echo sounding (RES). Continuous-wave (CW) radar systems should be referred to as ground-penetrating CW radars. We further suggest any additional characterisation of the system be expressed using descriptors that specify the platform it is mounted on (e.g. airborne) or the frequency range (e.g. HF (high frequency)) or modulation (e.g. FM (frequency modulated)).
Keywords: Airborne electromagnetic soundings, applied glaciology, glacier geophysics, ground-penetrating radar, radio-echo sounding
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: R. Schlegel is funded by the IMPACT operation fellowship, which has been part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government and Swansea University. This work was supported by NERC AFI award numbers NE/G014159/1, NE/G013187/1 and NE/F015879/1.
Issue: 87-89
Start Page: 8
End Page: 12