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Journal article 698 views

Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring

Michael Coffey Orcid Logo

Sociology of Health & Illness, Volume: 33, Issue: 5, Pages: 748 - 760

Swansea University Author: Michael Coffey Orcid Logo

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Abstract

This paper presents an example of how patient and worker accounts differ and provide competing versions of events. The data is derived from a study based on 59 interviews with workers and patients in forensic mental health settings. It shows how nascent identity work by patients is attempted in the...

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Published in: Sociology of Health & Illness
ISSN: 0141-9889
Published: 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6572
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first_indexed 2013-07-23T11:54:57Z
last_indexed 2019-06-14T19:00:30Z
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spelling 2019-06-14T14:45:59.1182582 v2 6572 2012-01-10 Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring 12112bd2ce15561464c98607f3a8eb0b 0000-0002-0380-4704 Michael Coffey Michael Coffey true false 2012-01-10 PHAC This paper presents an example of how patient and worker accounts differ and provide competing versions of events. The data is derived from a study based on 59 interviews with workers and patients in forensic mental health settings. It shows how nascent identity work by patients is attempted in the face of on-going aftercare monitoring and supervision. This aftercare is in part a response to discourses surrounding mental illness and risk behaviours towards others. Patients work to show development of new identities and independence from the psychiatric system. Workers however use occupational knowledge of risk as a rationale for their work of providing 'safe' aftercare. This knowledge works as a form of normalising ideology of what is to be understood as good mental health and non-risk oriented behaviours. Risk is therefore an ever-present concern for both parties in establishing aftercare arrangements and also for patients in attempting to formulate and put into action new identities for continued community living. Journal Article Sociology of Health & Illness 33 5 748 760 0141-9889 mental health, forensic, accounts 4 3 2011 2011-03-04 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01321.x COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University 2019-06-14T14:45:59.1182582 2012-01-10T15:01:45.2230000 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Health and Social Care - Public Health Michael Coffey 0000-0002-0380-4704 1
title Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring
spellingShingle Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring
Michael Coffey
title_short Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring
title_full Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring
title_fullStr Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring
title_full_unstemmed Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring
title_sort Resistance and challenge: competing accounts in aftercare monitoring
author_id_str_mv 12112bd2ce15561464c98607f3a8eb0b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 12112bd2ce15561464c98607f3a8eb0b_***_Michael Coffey
author Michael Coffey
author2 Michael Coffey
format Journal article
container_title Sociology of Health & Illness
container_volume 33
container_issue 5
container_start_page 748
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
issn 0141-9889
doi_str_mv 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01321.x
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Health and Social Care - Public Health{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Health and Social Care - Public Health
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description This paper presents an example of how patient and worker accounts differ and provide competing versions of events. The data is derived from a study based on 59 interviews with workers and patients in forensic mental health settings. It shows how nascent identity work by patients is attempted in the face of on-going aftercare monitoring and supervision. This aftercare is in part a response to discourses surrounding mental illness and risk behaviours towards others. Patients work to show development of new identities and independence from the psychiatric system. Workers however use occupational knowledge of risk as a rationale for their work of providing 'safe' aftercare. This knowledge works as a form of normalising ideology of what is to be understood as good mental health and non-risk oriented behaviours. Risk is therefore an ever-present concern for both parties in establishing aftercare arrangements and also for patients in attempting to formulate and put into action new identities for continued community living.
published_date 2011-03-04T03:10:37Z
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