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Did the COVID-19 pandemic affect levels of burnout, anxiety and depression among doctors and nurses in Bangladesh? A cross-sectional survey study

Hayley Hutchings Orcid Logo, Mesbah Rahman, Kym Carter Orcid Logo, Saiful Islam Orcid Logo, Claire O'Neill, Stephen Roberts Orcid Logo, Ann John Orcid Logo, Greg Fegan, Umakant Dave, Neil Hawkes, Faruque Ahmed, Mahmud Hasan, Abul Kalam Azad, Md Mujibur Rahman, Md Golam Kibria, M Masudur Rahman, Titu Mia, Mahfuza Akhter, John Williams

BMJ Open, Volume: 14, Issue: 3, Start page: e079350

Swansea University Authors: Hayley Hutchings Orcid Logo, Kym Carter Orcid Logo, Saiful Islam Orcid Logo, Claire O'Neill, Stephen Roberts Orcid Logo, Ann John Orcid Logo, Greg Fegan, John Williams

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Abstract

Introduction COVID-19 has caused severe disruption to clinical services in Bangladesh but the extent of this, and the impact on healthcare professionals is unclear. We aimed to assess the perceived levels of anxiety, depression and burnout among doctors and nurses during COVID-19 pandemic.Methods We...

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Published in: BMJ Open
ISSN: 2044-6055 2044-6055
Published: BMJ 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65787
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Abstract: Introduction COVID-19 has caused severe disruption to clinical services in Bangladesh but the extent of this, and the impact on healthcare professionals is unclear. We aimed to assess the perceived levels of anxiety, depression and burnout among doctors and nurses during COVID-19 pandemic.Methods We undertook an online survey using RedCap, directed at doctors and nurses across four institutions in Bangladesh (The Sheikh Russel Gastro Liver Institute & Hospital (SRNGIH), Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), Mugda Medical College Hospital (MMCH) and M Abdur Rahim Medical College (MARMC) Hospital). We collected information on demographics, awareness of well-being services, COVID-19-related workload, as well as anxiety, depression and burnout using two validated questionnaires: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI).Results Of the 3000 participants approached, we received responses from 2705 (90.2%). There was a statistically significant difference in anxiety, depression and burnout scores across institutions (p<0.01). Anxiety, depression and burnout scores were statistically worse in COVID-19 active staff compared with those not working on COVID-19 activities (p<0.01 for HADS anxiety and depression and MBI emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP) and personal accomplishment (PA)). Over half of the participants exhibited some level of anxiety (SRNGIH: 52.2%; DMCH: 53.9%; MMCH: 61.3%; MARMC: 68%) with a high proportion experiencing depression (SRNGIH: 39.5%; DMCH: 38.7%; MMCH: 53.7%; MARMC: 41.1%). Although mean burnout scores were within the normal range for each institution, a high proportion of staff (almost 20% in some instances) were shown to be classified as experiencing burnout by their EE, DP and PA scores.Conclusion We identified a high prevalence of perceived anxiety, depression and burnout among doctors and nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. This was worse in staff engaged in COVID-19-related activities. These findings could help healthcare organisations to plan for future similar events.
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: This study was funded by Swansea University through their Global Challenges Research Fund. Grant number: N/A.
Issue: 3
Start Page: e079350