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Durability of the moderate-to-heavy-intensity transition is related to the effects of prolonged exercise on severe-intensity performance

Kate Hamilton, Andrew E. Kilding Orcid Logo, Daniel J. Plews, Mathew J. Mildenhall, Mark Waldron Orcid Logo, Thanchanok Charoensap, Tobias H. Cox, Matthew J. Brick Orcid Logo, Warren B. Leigh Orcid Logo, Ed Maunder Orcid Logo

European Journal of Applied Physiology

Swansea University Author: Mark Waldron Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Purpose: Power output at the moderate-to-heavy intensity transition decreases during prolonged exercise. Resilience to this has been termed ‘durability’. The relationship between durability and performance, and the mechanistic determinants of durability, are not well-characterised. The purpose of th...

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Published in: European Journal of Applied Physiology
ISSN: 1439-6319 1439-6327
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65820
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Abstract: Purpose: Power output at the moderate-to-heavy intensity transition decreases during prolonged exercise. Resilience to this has been termed ‘durability’. The relationship between durability and performance, and the mechanistic determinants of durability, are not well-characterised. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between durability and the effect of prolonged exercise on severe-intensity performance, and explore intramuscular correlates of durability. Methods: On separate days, thirteen well-trained cyclists and triathletes (V̇O2peak, 57.3 ± 4.8 mL.kg-1.min-1; training volume, 12 ± 2.1 h.week-1) undertook an incremental test and 5-min time trial (TT) to determine power output at the first ventilatory threshold (VT1) and severe-intensity performance, with and without 150-min of prior moderate-intensity cycling. A single resting vastus lateralis microbiopsy was obtained.Results: Prolonged exercise reduced power output at VT1 (211 ± 40 vs. 198 ± 39 W, ∆ -13 ± 16 W, ∆ -6 ± 7%, P = 0.013) and 5-min TT performance (333 ± 75 vs. 302 ± 63 W, ∆ -31 ± 41 W, ∆ -9 ± 10%, P = 0.017). The reduction in 5-min TT performance was significantly associated with durability of VT1 (rs = 0.719, P = 0.007). Durability of VT1 was not related to vastus lateralis carnosine content, citrate synthase activity, or complex l activity (P > 0.05). Conclusion: These data provide the first direct support that durability of the moderate-to-heavy intensity transition is an important performance parameter. We did not find relationships between durability and vastus lateralis carnosine content, citrate synthase activity, or complex l activity.
Keywords: Durability, exercise, muscle
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: Open Access funding enabled and organized by CAUL and its Member Institutions. This work was supported by an award from the Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences Research Development Fund, Auckland University of Technology.