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Improving the Corrosion Performance of Organically Coated Steel Using a Sol–Gel Overcoat

Evan Watkins Orcid Logo, Christian Griffiths, Calvin Richards, Sarah-Jane Potts Orcid Logo, Chris Batchelor Orcid Logo, Peter Barker, Justin Searle Orcid Logo, Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo

Materials, Volume: 17, Issue: 5, Start page: 1075

Swansea University Authors: Evan Watkins Orcid Logo, Christian Griffiths, Calvin Richards, Sarah-Jane Potts Orcid Logo, Justin Searle Orcid Logo, Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ma17051075

Abstract

Organically coated steels are widely used in applications in which they are subjected to the natural environment and therefore require excellent corrosion resistance. Organic clearcoats are typically employed as a barrier that improves the overall corrosion resistance; however, they are typically de...

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Published in: Materials
ISSN: 1996-1944
Published: MDPI AG 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65848
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Abstract: Organically coated steels are widely used in applications in which they are subjected to the natural environment and therefore require excellent corrosion resistance. Organic clearcoats are typically employed as a barrier that improves the overall corrosion resistance; however, they are typically derived from fossil fuel-based feedstock. A more sustainable alternative could be possible using sol–gel coatings. The application of a simple tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)-based sol–gel was applied to polyurethane-coated steels using a spray coater. The concentration of TEOS was altered to produce coatings containing either 2.5% or 10%. The 10% TEOS resulted in dense, homogeneous coatings that offered a significant improvement in corrosion resistance compared to an uncoated substrate. Whereas the 2.5% TEOS coatings were inhomogeneous and porous, which indicated a limitation of concentration required to produce a uniform coating. The successful demonstration of using a simple TEOS-based coating to improve the corrosion resistance of organically coated steel highlights the potential for further investigation into the use of sol–gels for these applications.
Keywords: sol–gel; coatings; corrosion; barrier; coil coating
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: This work was made possible by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EP/S02252X/1), Innovate UK and by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government. The authors would like to thank the Materials and Manufacturing Academy and COATED CDT (COATED M2A) in Swansea University, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC via UKRI), the European Social Fund via the Welsh Government and TATA Steel UK for supporting the work described in this article. SEM facilities were provided by the Swansea University AIM Facility, funded in part by the EPSRC. Thanks also to NSG Pilkinton for providing spray coating facilities.
Issue: 5
Start Page: 1075