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A state-selected continuous wave laser excitation method for determining CO2’s rotational state distribution in a supersonic molecular beam

Charlotte Jansen Orcid Logo, Ludo B. F. Juurlink Orcid Logo, Richard van Lent Orcid Logo, Helen Chadwick Orcid Logo

Review of Scientific Instruments, Volume: 95, Issue: 5, Start page: 055111

Swansea University Author: Helen Chadwick Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1063/5.0203641

Abstract

State-resolved experiments can provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms behind chemical reactions. Here, we describe our methods for characterizing state-resolved experiments probing the outcome of the collision between CO2 molecules and surfaces. We create a molecular beam from a supersonic...

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Published in: Review of Scientific Instruments
ISSN: 0034-6748 1089-7623
Published: AIP Publishing 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66470
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Abstract: State-resolved experiments can provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms behind chemical reactions. Here, we describe our methods for characterizing state-resolved experiments probing the outcome of the collision between CO2 molecules and surfaces. We create a molecular beam from a supersonic expansion that passes through an ultra-high vacuum system. The CO2 is vibrationally excited by a continuous wave infrared (IR) laser using rapid adiabatic passage. We attenuate the fractional excitation using a CO2 absorption cell in the IR beam path. We combine Monte Carlo simulations and molecular beam energy measurements to find the initial rotational state distribution of the molecular beam. We find that our pure CO2 beam from a 300 K source has a rotational temperature of ∼26 K.
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: This work was part of the research program Materials for Sustainability with Project No. 739.017.008, which is (partly) financed by the Dutch Research Council (NWO).
Issue: 5
Start Page: 055111