No Cover Image

Journal article 93 views 37 downloads

Early exposure to sugar sweetened beverages or fruit juice differentially influences adult adiposity

David Benton, Hayley Young Orcid Logo

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume: 78, Issue: 6, Pages: 521 - 526

Swansea University Authors: David Benton, Hayley Young Orcid Logo

  • 66552.VoR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    © The Author(s) 2024. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

    Download (466.48KB)

Abstract

ObjectiveTo examine associations between different types of sweet drinks consumed in early life and adult adiposity.DesignThe analysis involved the secondary analysis of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children which followed children from birth to 24 years. Adiposity was measured using D...

Full description

Published in: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
ISSN: 0954-3007 1476-5640
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66552
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: ObjectiveTo examine associations between different types of sweet drinks consumed in early life and adult adiposity.DesignThe analysis involved the secondary analysis of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children which followed children from birth to 24 years. Adiposity was measured using Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry while food frequency questionnaires and diaries monitored diet. ‘Early exposure’ to sweet drinks was defined as giving a sugar-sweetened beverage or 100% fruit juice (FJ), before two years of age.ResultsEarly exposure to cola was associated with higher fat mass, android fat mass and BMI at age 24 years; whereas early exposure to apple juice was associated with lower adult adiposity in females but not males. When age three, exposure to cola was associated with a greater intake of energy, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and less fruit and more fried foods. In contrast, early exposure to apple juice was associated with higher protein and lower fat intakes and consuming more fruits/vegetables and less fried foods. Parental education, adiposity and socio-economic status influenced whether SSB or FJ was given to a child.ConclusionsEarly drinking of sugar sweetened beverages was associated with a less healthy dietary pattern, and greater adult adiposity. Early drinking of apple juice was associated with a healthier dietary pattern, and lower fat mass in adult females. The choice of drink was associated with social deprivation. As the dietary causes of adult obesity begin in early childhood, increased attention should be given to diet in the first years of life.
Keywords: Ageing; Nutrition
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: The European Fruit Juice Association, Brussels, gave an “Unrestricted grant” to Swansea University that was used to pay for access to the ALSPAC data base. Legally such a gift cannot impose any restrictions on its use, therefore the decision to conduct this study, its planning, execution, and the decision to publish, were those of the authors.
Issue: 6
Start Page: 521
End Page: 526