No Cover Image

Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 24 views 11 downloads

Screen Printed Glassy Carbon: Applications in Printed Electronics and Sensors

Davide Deganello Orcid Logo, Christopher Phillips Orcid Logo, Ben Clifford Orcid Logo, Brent de Boode

IEEE International Conference on Flexible, Printable, Sensors and Systems (IEEE FLEPS 2024), Volume: ID: 4104

Swansea University Authors: Davide Deganello Orcid Logo, Christopher Phillips Orcid Logo, Ben Clifford Orcid Logo, Brent de Boode

Abstract

Glassy carbon is a non-graphitizing carbon with unique properties including low electrical resistance, and high chemical and temperature resistance. This work demonstrates the use of glassy carbon for applications in printed electronics and sensors. Screen printing was adopted to pattern phenol form...

Full description

Published in: IEEE International Conference on Flexible, Printable, Sensors and Systems (IEEE FLEPS 2024)
Published:
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66639
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Glassy carbon is a non-graphitizing carbon with unique properties including low electrical resistance, and high chemical and temperature resistance. This work demonstrates the use of glassy carbon for applications in printed electronics and sensors. Screen printing was adopted to pattern phenol formaldehyde as a precursor, which was subsequently thermally converted to glassy carbon, on an alumina substrate. The resulting glassy carbon printed patterns were characterized, demonstrating an electrical resistivity of around 2x10-4 Ohmmeter. A circuit using printed glassy carbon as a conductor and incorporating a LED was fabricated to functionally demonstrate the material. Finally, the printed glassy carbon was tested as a temperature sensor up to 140 °C, presenting a reliable temperature coefficient of resistance of around -0.0021Ohm/Ohm/°C. These results demonstrate the viability of presented fabrication process by printing for novel integration of printed glassy carbon into printed electronics, as demonstrated for printed circuits and temperature sensing, with advantages in principle of suitability for harsh and chemicaldemanding environments.
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: EPSRC