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Using the Health Action Process Approach and implementation intentions to increase flu vaccine uptake in high risk Thai individuals: A controlled before-after trial. / Yupares Payaprom; Paul Bennett; Erica Alabaster; Hutsaya Tantipong

Health Psychology, Volume: 30, Issue: 4, Pages: 492 - 500

Swansea University Author: Paul, Bennett

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DOI (Published version): 10.1037/a0023580

Abstract

<p>Objective: Influenza vaccination rates remain suboptimal in many countries, including Thailand. This study compared the effect of a theory-based educational leaflet, based on the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA), and action planning intervention with a standard government inf...

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Published in: Health Psychology
ISSN: 1930-7810 0278-6133
Published: American Psychological Association 2011
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6776
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Abstract: <p>Objective: Influenza vaccination rates remain suboptimal in many countries, including Thailand. This study compared the effect of a theory-based educational leaflet, based on the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA), and action planning intervention with a standard government information leaflet designed to increase influenza vaccination uptake among high-risk Thai adults. Design: A controlled before and after trial was conducted. Participants in the intervention (n = 99) received a leaflet based on the HAPA and asking them to form an action plan identifying where, when, and how they would seek vaccination. Those in the comparison condition (n = 102) received a standard government information leaflet. Main Outcomes Measures: There are 2 sets of outcome measures: (a) process measures of HAPA related variables taken at T1 and T2, and (b) vaccination rates during the subsequent 2 months. Results: The HAPA intervention resulted in greater changes on measures of risk perception, outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, and intention than the comparison condition. Stronger intentions to obtain vaccination were explained by changes in outcome expectancies, perceived self-efficacy for arranging time and transportation, and planning. No significant difference in vaccination rates was observed between two groups. Influenza vaccination was directly predicted by self-efficacy and intention. Conclusion: Results demonstrate that a HAPA-based leaflet may be a useful tool to enhance individual's vaccination intention, but larger trials are required to confirm these findings.</p>
Keywords: before-after study, influenza vaccination, Health Action Process Approach
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 4
Start Page: 492
End Page: 500