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Informational affordances: evidence of acquired perception–action sequences for information extraction / Irene Reppa; William C. Schmidt; Robert Ward

Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume: 19, Issue: 3, Pages: 418 - 428

Swansea University Author: Reppa, Irene

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Abstract

<p>It is now quite common to speak of "perception for action", emphasising that many of our perceptual systems serve an ultimate role in guiding action. However, we might also legitimately speak of "action for perception", in which action can serve the more proximate goal,...

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Published in: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
ISSN: 1069-9384 1531-5320
Published: 2012
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6926
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Abstract: <p>It is now quite common to speak of "perception for action", emphasising that many of our perceptual systems serve an ultimate role in guiding action. However, we might also legitimately speak of "action for perception", in which action can serve the more proximate goal, of allowing us to better perceive an object's properties. The current study examined whether object perception can automatically prime actions leading to efficient information extraction. Participants in Experiment 1 learned to rotate a cube in a specific way with the end goal of efficiently revealing object-identifying information. In Experiments 2 and 3 the end goal of producing object-identifying information was removed but the stimulus-response associations were preserved. In a subsequent test phase, where the object was irrelevant, only object views associated with actions learned in the context of obtaining object-identifying information caused response interference. These results demonstrate the existence of informational affordances: perception-action sequences acquired with the goal of information extraction that are automatically primed during later exposure to the object. Our results show one way that perception and action are linked in recursive fashion: by way of perception utilizing action in order to facilitate the goal of perceiving.</p>
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 3
Start Page: 418
End Page: 428